Sharing is caring. So I am sharing something I received from Dale Carnegie

1. Make A Great First Impression – Before starting, practice what you will say when introducing yourself; think about all of the questions people might ask you and develop your answers. Choose honest, concise responses, but be sure to be friendly. Don’t forget to dress for success and shine your shoes!

2. Get To Know Your Company And The People Of The Company
If you have not done so already, take the time to read up on your company (using the company’s website or industry articles as sources). Once you start gathering more information, observe the work environment and understand everyone’s job and the impact they have on getting things done. Most importantly, don’t get caught up on the company’s gossip.

3. Own Your Mistakes – It is typically expected that a new hire will make a mistake somewhere down the line. Face a blunder head on and ask for help immediately. Learn from it, and ensure that this same problem does not happen again.

4. Know Your Manager – Since your manager will be evaluating you and often makes decisions about your career with regards to promotions, raises, etc., you want to make him or her as happy as possible. Find out how he/she works, what they are most concerned about, and what they expect of you. Don’t forget to pay special attention on how he/she likes to communicate (meetings vs. e-mails) and their overall management style. The bottom line is that you want to create a positive work relationship right from the get-go.

5. Know Your Job And How Your Performance Will Be Graded -Sometimes aspects of a job are a little different than what you thought during the interview. Talk to your manager early on so that you are both on the same page about expectations, how he/she will evaluate your performance, and so on.

6. Do Your Homework – While enthusiasm is wonderful, it is not usually a great idea to rush into a new position and try to make many drastic changes right off the bat. There might be very legitimate reasons that certain policies or practices are in place, and you will look much more competent if you ask questions and do your homework before making big suggestions. You do not want to alienate yourself from your peers by stepping on their toes, especially if the changes you are suggesting have already been tried before or are not even possible.

7. Be Friendly – Never underestimate a good smile. You want everyone at your new job to be on your side. You do not necessarily need to be everyone’s friend, but you want people to have your back. Also, work is lot easier if you are on friendly terms with those around you.

Executive Summary: Being a new hire is not always fun, but with a little research, patience and diligence, it does not have to be a truly stressful experience. Heed the advice listed above to make the transition to your next job as smooth as possible.