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Installing vCenter Appliance 6.5

With the general availability (GA) release of vSphere 6.5 I decided to upgrade my home lab and learning environment to the latest and greatest of VMware’s product. Not only for learning, but for running the systems I use daily in my lab.

Preparation work:

  • Download and Install ESXi 6.5 to my new lab hardware – Configure ESXi 6.5
  • Download the VCSA 6.5 Installation media and start the install process – See below

I mounted the installation media (ISO) on my Windows notebook and started the installation by navigating to \vcsa-ui-installer\win32\ and starting the installer.exe application.

This will display the Center Server Appliance 6.5 Installer. Seeing how this install will be a new installation of vCenter I selected “Install”

Here you find a two step installation process. The first step will deploy a vCenter Server 6,5 appliance and the second step will be configuring this deployed appliance.

Accept the standard End User License Agreement (EULA) to move forward into the installation.

Next you select the type of installation you need for your environment needs. In my case I have chosen the embedded Platform Services Controller deployment.

Next, choose the ESXi host where you would like to have this vCenter appliance deployed and provide the root credentials of the host for authentication.

Then, provide a name for the vCenter appliance VM that is going to be deployed and set the root password for the appliance.

Based upon your environment size, select the sizing of the vCenter appliance. I went with Tiny as it fits the needs of my Lab environment. Note: It will configure the Virtual Appliance with 10GB of ram so be sure you can support this in yours.

Next, select the datastore where the vCenter appliance files need to reside.

Configure the networking of vCenter appliance. Please have a valid IP which can be resolved both forward / reverse prior to this to prevent any failures during installation.

Review and finish the deployment, and the progress for stage 1 begins. Upon completion, Continue to proceed to configure the appliance. This is stage 2.

The stage 2 wizard begins at this point. The first section is to configure Network Time Protocol (NTP) setting for the appliance and enable Shell access for the same.

Next configure an SSO domain name, the SSO password and the Site name for the appliance. Once the configuration wizard is completed you can login to the web client.

The following short video I made gives you an feel for the install process. Enjoy.

 

 

vSphere 6.5 release notes & download links

 

This weekend I had the fun of getting my hands and feet wet with installs of VMware’s ESXi 6.5 and vCenter 6.5. The links below should be useful to any of you looking to learn about the new release and download bits to install.

Release Notes:

Downloads:

Documentation:

We Are America ft. John Cena | Love Has No Labels | Ad Council

Well said…

To love America is to love all Americans. John Cena takes a break between dropping body slams to drop some truth – that patriotism is more than pride of country, it’s love beyond labels.

While the vast majority of Americans consider themselves unprejudiced, many of us unintentionally make snap judgments about people based on what we see – whether it’s race, age, gender, religion, sexuality, or disability. The Love Has No Labels campaign challenges us to open our eyes to our implicit, or unconscious, bias and work to stop it in ourselves, our families, our friends, and our colleagues. Rethink your bias at www.lovehasnolabels.com.

Share your support for love and inclusion by creating your own #WeAreAmerica gif at www.lovehasnolabels.com

7 Tips For All New Employees To Read – Dale Carnegie

Sharing is caring. So I am sharing something I received from Dale Carnegie

1. Make A Great First Impression – Before starting, practice what you will say when introducing yourself; think about all of the questions people might ask you and develop your answers. Choose honest, concise responses, but be sure to be friendly. Don’t forget to dress for success and shine your shoes!

2. Get To Know Your Company And The People Of The Company
If you have not done so already, take the time to read up on your company (using the company’s website or industry articles as sources). Once you start gathering more information, observe the work environment and understand everyone’s job and the impact they have on getting things done. Most importantly, don’t get caught up on the company’s gossip.

3. Own Your Mistakes – It is typically expected that a new hire will make a mistake somewhere down the line. Face a blunder head on and ask for help immediately. Learn from it, and ensure that this same problem does not happen again.

4. Know Your Manager – Since your manager will be evaluating you and often makes decisions about your career with regards to promotions, raises, etc., you want to make him or her as happy as possible. Find out how he/she works, what they are most concerned about, and what they expect of you. Don’t forget to pay special attention on how he/she likes to communicate (meetings vs. e-mails) and their overall management style. The bottom line is that you want to create a positive work relationship right from the get-go.

5. Know Your Job And How Your Performance Will Be Graded -Sometimes aspects of a job are a little different than what you thought during the interview. Talk to your manager early on so that you are both on the same page about expectations, how he/she will evaluate your performance, and so on.

6. Do Your Homework – While enthusiasm is wonderful, it is not usually a great idea to rush into a new position and try to make many drastic changes right off the bat. There might be very legitimate reasons that certain policies or practices are in place, and you will look much more competent if you ask questions and do your homework before making big suggestions. You do not want to alienate yourself from your peers by stepping on their toes, especially if the changes you are suggesting have already been tried before or are not even possible.

7. Be Friendly – Never underestimate a good smile. You want everyone at your new job to be on your side. You do not necessarily need to be everyone’s friend, but you want people to have your back. Also, work is lot easier if you are on friendly terms with those around you.

Executive Summary: Being a new hire is not always fun, but with a little research, patience and diligence, it does not have to be a truly stressful experience. Heed the advice listed above to make the transition to your next job as smooth as possible.

QOTD: “for whom the bell tolls”


“Any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankind; And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.” – John Donne

QOTD: Good Move – Emanuel Lasker

“When you see a good move, look for a better one”

― Emanuel Lasker

QOTD: “Act Like You’ve Been Somewhere”

“Stand up straight. Put your shoulders back. Act like you got some sense.”  “Act Like You’ve Been Somewhere” – Jamie Foxx

Jamie Foxx

 

Eric Marlon Bishop (born December 13, 1967),[1] known professionally by his stage name Jamie Foxx, is an American actor, singer, songwriter and comedian. Winner of Academy Award for Best Actor, BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role, and Golden Globe Award for Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy

‘#22Kill’ Push-up Challenge, What It Means

A few weeks back, I had the chance to visit the Team #22KILL website and to participate in this now social media awareness challenge to bring about awareness not only to myself but to others that a shocking number of  soldiers and veterans die every day as a result of suicide.

Marked by the hashtag “#22Kill” , “#22KillPushUpChallenge,”  or “#22pushups”, people are responding with 22 push-ups for a cause.

As stated on the site the goal is to “Help us reach our goal to get 22 Million pushups – To honor those who serve and to raise awareness for veteran suicide prevention through education and empowerment.”

So my journey began via my YouTube channel 

Starting From Day 1 to Day 22

Suicide Prevention, whether it be for vet’s or the everyday person is a serious cause that needs your support.

If You Need help? For Yourself or a Loved one.

Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at: 1 (800) 273-8255

You will find supportive individuals willing to offer you the tools you need.

If you want to join the challenge – or challenge a friend – make sure that you include the hashtag “#22Kill” and that your post is made “public” so that 22Kill can keep their count accurate. You can also become a veteran advocate yourself by volunteering through the 22Kill organization website.

Thanks

Showing my 6yr old how to install ADFS v3.0

I know sounds odd to be showing a 6yr old how to setup and configure ADFS, but this is what I did tonight as I had no one else to work with on this exercise.

So lets go over what was done.

  1. Three (3) Windows Server 2012 R2 installs
  2. Server 1 was promoted to a domain controller
  3. Server 2 was made an enterprise CA for the domain
  4. Server 3 was made the ADFS server
  5. After testing the configuration I enabled the update password feature.

Now that this install has been completed I will federate with something such as my Sales Force dev account or my Office 365 account.

All done!

And my 6yr old is not paying a bit of attention to this work. He’s playing Minecraft and watching YouTube videos.

 

The Appearance of Physical Strength May Be the Look of Leadership

In a further sign that humans aren’t so different from our simian forebears, it seems that what really makes a man look like a leader is…muscles.

That is the implication of a recent paper that outlines several experiments exploring the relationship between perceptions of physical strength and leadership abilities. The research suggests that both men and women associate the appearance of physical strength with leadership qualities and higher status, at least in men.

The experiments—conducted by psychologists at the Berkeley and Santa Barbara campuses of the University of California, the University of Portland and Oklahoma State—showed a group of volunteers images of young men and women supposedly hired by a new consulting firm. In the pictures, the young people, who had previously been tested and scored for upper-body strength, wore tank tops that showed off their physiques.

When shown sets of men, the volunteers consistently rated the ones with higher strength scores as having more leadership ability, evidently inferring strength from buff physiques. But when shown sets of women, there was no correlation between perceived strength and leadership qualities. Greater height, on the other hand, made both men and women seem more like leaders (and smarter too), although the leadership effect of height wasn’t as great as that of strength.

A key caveat: If a man looked to the raters as if he were likely to use his strength “in forceful pursuit of self-interest”—if he somehow looked like a bully—it detracted from his leadership aura.

The researchers didn’t ask the raters about something as vague as “leadership skills.” Instead, they hypothesized that people see “physical formidability” as a measure of the ability to perform specific leadership roles. Sure enough, the experiments revealed that the more muscular men were rated as more likely to enforce rules and norms within a group and to represent that group effectively in encounters with other groups.

“Strong men are seen as deserving of high status because of their ability to generate valuable leadership benefits,” says Aaron W. Lukaszewski, an Oklahoma State psychology professor who worked on the study. But they are only seen this way if they benefit the group, he adds: “Physically strong men who are perceived as aggressively self-interested are actually granted less status than their gentler counterparts.”

To make sure that the findings weren’t just an effect of facial attractiveness or a lantern jaw, the psychologists ran the experiment again, with pictures showing the faces of weaker men attached to stronger bodies and vice versa. The switch basically had no effect; the leadership ratings of the strong bodies were about the same as they had been before, despite the addition of the weaker men’s faces, suggesting that the key factor was strength and not physiognomy.

“The Role of Physical Formidability in Human Social Status Allocation,” Aaron W. Lukaszewski, Zachary L. Simmons, Cameron Anderson and James R. Roney, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Dec. 14

 

Comment:

I was forwarded this article from “The Wall Street Journal”.  IMO, an interesting read, I had to share.  — More of a reason to go to the gym