General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), General Definitions

Personal Data: Broadly defined as any data element(s) that can directly or indirectly identify an individual. Examples include: name, e-mail address, government identifiers (such as a passport or Social Security Number/Social Insurance Number), credit card information, and biometric data (such as fingerprints). It can also include any records associated with or linked to such personal information, such as medical diagnoses, purchase histories, browser cookies, etc. Please note: we are also concerned with data that falls into a more “sensitive” subcategory which requires a higher standard of protection and legal justification to process. These sensitive data elements, which are defined in some laws, include: religious beliefs, political opinions, race, ethnicity, union membership, sexual life, any health-related information including biometric or genetic data, information about criminal/civil offenses, financial information (such as credit card numbers), geo-location information, and any other data which would present a potential risk to security or personal safety if that information was misused.

Third Party: Third party, in relation to Personal Data, means any person other than the individual described by the data (the “Data Subject”), or the Company. For purposes of this survey, Third Parties will usually include vendors, service providers, or any other entity involved in gathering, processing, or storing the data in question, affiliates, and any entity not under your Company’s legal structure. When in doubt, please provide the name of any other entity involved and we can confirm with the legal department the precise status of the business/organizational relationship.

Anonymization/Pseudonymization: Process by which Personal Data is irreversibly altered in such a way that it cannot longer be identified directly or indirectly, or assigned an identifier that is disconnected from the data subject’s identity (such as a random code number)

Biometric Data: A category of Personal Data resulting from specific technical processing relating to the physical, physiological or behavioral characteristics of a natural person, which allow or confirm the unique identification of that natural person, such as facial images or fingerprint data

Health Data: A category of Personal Data related to the physical or mental health of a natural person, including the provision of health care services, which reveal information about his or her health status

Genetic Data: A category of Personal Data relating to the inherited or acquired genetic characteristics of a natural person which give unique information about the physiology or the health of that natural person and which result, in particular, from an analysis of a biological sample from the natural person in question, e.g., DNA reports

Processing: For purposes of this survey, “processing” of data includes any operation or set of operations which is performed on any Personal Data, whether or not by automated means; this can include collection, recording, organization, structuring, storage, adaptation or alteration, retrieval, consultation, use, disclosure by transmission, dissemination or otherwise making available, alignment or combination, restriction, erasure or destruction

Profiling: Any form of automated processing in which Personal Data may be used to evaluate certain personal attributes or behavioral aspects relating to a natural person, in particular to analyze or predict aspects concerning that natural person’s performance at work, economic situation (including creditworthiness), health or lifestyle choices, personal preferences, interests, assessments of personal character or reliability, behavior, location or movements

Maintaining Professionalism At Work

Summary: Few qualities are as key as professionalism. The consummate business professional combines the right attitude, competence, and awareness of image and etiquette. Moreover, professionalism does not stop when you leave the office. Professionals lead by example whether they are at a meeting or a business social event. Upholding business professionalism is fundamental to making others feel comfortable doing business with you.


Tips To Maintaining Business Professionalism:

1. Portray A Professional Image – The majority of companies in the U.S. enforce a mandatory dress code; therefore, it is your responsibility to adhere to these requirements, even if it is not discussed during orientation. Although dress codes will vary from organization to organization, most corporate dress codes prohibit shorts or excessively tight clothing.

Always be aware of what is appropriate for the industry and situation. For example, a construction supervisor might meet with a client while wearing jeans and a flannel shirt; however, an entry-level office worker who wears the same clothing would not be considered appropriate. To get an idea of what is acceptable, observe the leaders at your company and follow their example.

2. Embody Professional Qualities ¬- Much like a dress code, standards of business professionalism can vary by industry and company. Nevertheless, the core values of professionalism exist in every industry. Companies are always in search of employees that embody the following qualities: integrity, credibility, pride, promptness, accountability, and competence. Additionally, lauded professionals are excellent communicators who are eager to learn and elevate the work of others.

3. Remember: You Are Always “On” ¬- Never forget that when
you interact with others in and out of the office, you are always on “camera”. Your reactions to challenges, pressure, and stressful situations are always being judged. Regardless of the setting, always consider the consequences of your actions. Remain aware of your behavior even in casual venues, such as holiday parties (especially those involving alcohol) and networking events.

4. The Three Aspects of Professionalism – Numerous variables come together to define “professionalism.” We have distilled the many facets of professionalism into three key areas that you and your team should always reflect on.

Interpersonal Skills – Your interaction with contacts, coworkers, clients, vendors, supervisors, and subordinates sets the tone. Treating these people with respect and consideration is crucial.
Attitude – Always maintain a positive and forward-thinking attitude. Be friendly to others and avoid getting too low when things don’t work out how you expected. Remember, your body language reveals a lot and should radiate confidence and openness, without hostility or aggression.
Leadership – A strong leader is one that unites a team and creates synergy between staff. Leaders that instill value, quality and integrity in their employees are responsible for setting the bar on what is considered professional. Additionally, you want to help your team bring solutions to the table; not complaints. Take the initiative by being a leader.

*Credit* – Dale Carnegie

Showing my 6yr old how to install ADFS v3.0

I know sounds odd to be showing a 6yr old how to setup and configure ADFS, but this is what I did tonight as I had no one else to work with on this exercise.

So lets go over what was done.

  1. Three (3) Windows Server 2012 R2 installs
  2. Server 1 was promoted to a domain controller
  3. Server 2 was made an enterprise CA for the domain
  4. Server 3 was made the ADFS server
  5. After testing the configuration I enabled the update password feature.

Now that this install has been completed I will federate with something such as my Sales Force dev account or my Office 365 account.

All done!

And my 6yr old is not paying a bit of attention to this work. He’s playing Minecraft and watching YouTube videos.


3 lessons to be learned from a Pencil

  1. Pain always sharpens you.
  2. Everything you do leaves a mark.
  3. What’s inside you is useful, not what’s outside.


The su Command: Elevate Yourself

OS:  Unix / Linux

Often called the “Super User” command. The su (short for substitute user) command makes it possible to change a login session’s owner without the owner having to first log out of that session.

Although su can be used to change the ownership of a session to any user, it is most commonly used to change the ownership from an ordinary user to the root (i.e., administrative) user, thereby providing access to all parts of and all commands on the computer or system.

And like that of Goku from Dragon Ball Z you elevate yourself to be a powerful user.

Usage example:

sysadmin@jermsmit:~$ su