“Pure Imagination” — RIP, Gene Wilder

Gene Wilder, who regularly stole the show in such comedic gems as “The Producers,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Young Frankenstein,” “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” and “Stir Crazy,” died Monday at his home in Stamford, Conn. His nephew Jordan Walker-Pearlman said he died of complications from Alzheimer’s disease. He was 83.

Rest in peace old friend, you will love on in memory forever

 

Sang no better than this:

Come with me
And you’ll be
In a world of pure imagination
Take a look
And you’ll see
Into your imagination
We’ll begin
With a spin
Traveling in
The world of my creation
What we’ll see
Will defy
Explanation
If you want to view paradise
Simply look around and view it
Anything you want to, do it
Want to change the world?
There’s nothing to it
There is no
Life I know
To compare with pure imagination
Living there
You’ll be free
If you truly wish to be
If you want to see magic lands
Close your eyes and you will see one
Want to be a dreamer, be one
Anytime you please and please save me one

QOTD: Good Move – Emanuel Lasker

“When you see a good move, look for a better one”

― Emanuel Lasker

The Champ is Here

Somewhere in heaven a door opens, through the Veil he enters and the words are spoken “The champ is here”

One of the most transcendent athletes ever to compete in our country (and the world), Muhammad Ali, who died Friday at the age of 74.

A true legend. RIP, Champ (Muhammad Ali).

QOTD: “Act Like You’ve Been Somewhere”

“Stand up straight. Put your shoulders back. Act like you got some sense.”  “Act Like You’ve Been Somewhere” – Jamie Foxx

Jamie Foxx

 

Eric Marlon Bishop (born December 13, 1967),[1] known professionally by his stage name Jamie Foxx, is an American actor, singer, songwriter and comedian. Winner of Academy Award for Best Actor, BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Leading Role, and Golden Globe Award for Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy

‘#22Kill’ Push-up Challenge, What It Means

A few weeks back, I had the chance to visit the Team #22KILL website and to participate in this now social media awareness challenge to bring about awareness not only to myself but to others that a shocking number of  soldiers and veterans die every day as a result of suicide.

Marked by the hashtag “#22Kill” , “#22KillPushUpChallenge,”  or “#22pushups”, people are responding with 22 push-ups for a cause.

As stated on the site the goal is to “Help us reach our goal to get 22 Million pushups – To honor those who serve and to raise awareness for veteran suicide prevention through education and empowerment.”

So my journey began via my YouTube channel 

Starting From Day 1 to Day 22

Suicide Prevention, whether it be for vet’s or the everyday person is a serious cause that needs your support.

If You Need help? For Yourself or a Loved one.

Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at: 1 (800) 273-8255

You will find supportive individuals willing to offer you the tools you need.

If you want to join the challenge – or challenge a friend – make sure that you include the hashtag “#22Kill” and that your post is made “public” so that 22Kill can keep their count accurate. You can also become a veteran advocate yourself by volunteering through the 22Kill organization website.

Thanks

Dangerous 7-Zip flaws put many other software products at risk | PCWorld

The flaws could allow arbitrary code execution when the 7-Zip library processes specially crafted files

Code reuse makes it hard to keep track of vulnerabilities
Credit: IDGNS

Two vulnerabilities recently patched in 7-Zip could put at risk of compromise many software products and devices that bundle the open-source file archiving library.

The flaws, an out-of-bounds read vulnerability and a heap overflow, were discovered by researchers from Cisco’s Talos security team. They were fixed in 7-Zip 16.00, released Tuesday.

The 7-Zip software can pack and unpack files using a large number of archive formats, including its own 7z format, which is more efficient than ZIP. Its versatility and open-source nature make it an attractive library to include in other software projects that need to process and deal with archived files.

Previous research has shown that most developers do a poor job of keeping track of vulnerabilities in the third-party code they use and that they rarely update the libraries included in their projects.

“7-Zip is supported on all major platforms, and is one of the most popular archive utilities in-use today,” the Cisco Talos researchers said in a blog post. “Users may be surprised to discover just how many products and appliances are affected.”

A search on Google reveals that 7-Zip is used in many software projects, including in security devices and antivirus products. Many custom enterprise applications also likely use it.

The out-of-bounds read vulnerability, tracked as CVE-2016-2335, stems from 7-Zip’s handling of Universal Disk Format (UDF) files, while the heap overflow condition, CVE-2016-2334, can occur when handling zlib compressed files.

To exploit the flaws, attackers can craft specially crafted files in those formats and deliver them in a way that would cause the vulnerable 7-Zip code to process them.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/3069975/dangerous-7-zip-flaws-put-many-other-software-products-at-risk.html

Office 365 IRM & Azure Rights Management

I recently configured IRM to protect documents and email communications as part of a security initiative.

Information Rights Management (IRM) in Exchange Online uses Active Directory Rights Management Services (AD RMS), an information protection technology service in Office 365. IRM protection is applied to email by applying an AD RMS rights policy template to an email message. Usage rights are attached to the message itself so that protection occurs online and offline and inside and outside of your organization’s firewall

Need to know info:

  • Time to complete this task: 30-60 minutes
  • You need to be assigned admin permissions to manage IRM
  • Knowledge of using Windows PowerShell to connect to Exchange Online

Steps Taken:

Step 1: Activating Azure Rights Management

  1. Log into the Office 365 admin center
  2. In the left pan expand the services settings
  3. Click Rights Management
  4. On the Rights Management page, click Manage
  5. On the Rights Management page, click Activate
  6. You will be prompted with the question: Do you want to activate Rights Management? click activate.

You should now see Rights Management is activated

Step 2: Using Exchange Management Shell to log into Office 365

Here I use PowerShell ISE to step through he process

# Login to the Office 365 Account

Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned

$UserCredential = Get-Credential

$Session = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://outlook.office365.com/powershell-liveid/ -Credential $UserCredential -Authentication Basic -AllowRedirection

Import-PSSession $Session

Step 3: Use the Exchange Management Shell to configure the RMS Online key sharing location in Exchange Online

#Displaying the IRM Configuration

Get-IRMConfiguration

# List of Locaitons

#North America https://sp-rms.na.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc

#European Union https://sp-rms.eu.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc

#Asia https://sp-rms.ap.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc

#South America https://sp-rms.sa.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc

#Office 365 for Government (Government Community Cloud) https://sp-rms.govus.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc

Set-IRMConfiguration -RMSOnlineKeySharingLocation “https://sp-rms.na.aadrm.com/TenantManagement/ServicePartner.svc”

#Checking that the configraiton was applied

Get-IRMConfiguration

Step 4: Importing Trusted Publishing Domain (TPD) from RMS Online

Import-RMSTrustedPublishingDomain -RMSOnline -name “RMS Online”

Test-IRMConfiguration -RMSOnline

Step5: Enabling IRM in Exchange Online

Set-IRMConfiguration -InternalLicensingEnabled $true

Step 5: Testing the IRM configuration

Get-IRMConfiguration

Test-IRMConfiguration -Sender jsmith@jermsmit.tld

Expected Results should show that each area verified has passed

Ref Links:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj983436(v=exchg.150).aspx

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Set-up-Information-Rights-Management-IRM-in-SharePoint-admin-center-239ce6eb-4e81-42db-bf86-a01362fed65c

Summery  image of my PowerShell ISE

 

Showing my 6yr old how to install ADFS v3.0

I know sounds odd to be showing a 6yr old how to setup and configure ADFS, but this is what I did tonight as I had no one else to work with on this exercise.

So lets go over what was done.

  1. Three (3) Windows Server 2012 R2 installs
  2. Server 1 was promoted to a domain controller
  3. Server 2 was made an enterprise CA for the domain
  4. Server 3 was made the ADFS server
  5. After testing the configuration I enabled the update password feature.

Now that this install has been completed I will federate with something such as my Sales Force dev account or my Office 365 account.

All done!

And my 6yr old is not paying a bit of attention to this work. He’s playing Minecraft and watching YouTube videos.

 

How do I remove the Windows.old

After a recent update of my Windows 10 installation, I was left with the expected Windows.old folder containing 16 GB of old data.

It’s time to clean up.  Here are the steps I followed to make this happen.

Steps:

  1. Click in Windows’ search field, type Cleanup, then click Disk Cleanup.
  2.  Click the “Clean up system files” button.
  3. Scroll down the list until you see “Previous Windows installation(s).”
  4. Check the box next to the entry. Click OK to start the cleanup.

 

The Appearance of Physical Strength May Be the Look of Leadership

In a further sign that humans aren’t so different from our simian forebears, it seems that what really makes a man look like a leader is…muscles.

That is the implication of a recent paper that outlines several experiments exploring the relationship between perceptions of physical strength and leadership abilities. The research suggests that both men and women associate the appearance of physical strength with leadership qualities and higher status, at least in men.

The experiments—conducted by psychologists at the Berkeley and Santa Barbara campuses of the University of California, the University of Portland and Oklahoma State—showed a group of volunteers images of young men and women supposedly hired by a new consulting firm. In the pictures, the young people, who had previously been tested and scored for upper-body strength, wore tank tops that showed off their physiques.

When shown sets of men, the volunteers consistently rated the ones with higher strength scores as having more leadership ability, evidently inferring strength from buff physiques. But when shown sets of women, there was no correlation between perceived strength and leadership qualities. Greater height, on the other hand, made both men and women seem more like leaders (and smarter too), although the leadership effect of height wasn’t as great as that of strength.

A key caveat: If a man looked to the raters as if he were likely to use his strength “in forceful pursuit of self-interest”—if he somehow looked like a bully—it detracted from his leadership aura.

The researchers didn’t ask the raters about something as vague as “leadership skills.” Instead, they hypothesized that people see “physical formidability” as a measure of the ability to perform specific leadership roles. Sure enough, the experiments revealed that the more muscular men were rated as more likely to enforce rules and norms within a group and to represent that group effectively in encounters with other groups.

“Strong men are seen as deserving of high status because of their ability to generate valuable leadership benefits,” says Aaron W. Lukaszewski, an Oklahoma State psychology professor who worked on the study. But they are only seen this way if they benefit the group, he adds: “Physically strong men who are perceived as aggressively self-interested are actually granted less status than their gentler counterparts.”

To make sure that the findings weren’t just an effect of facial attractiveness or a lantern jaw, the psychologists ran the experiment again, with pictures showing the faces of weaker men attached to stronger bodies and vice versa. The switch basically had no effect; the leadership ratings of the strong bodies were about the same as they had been before, despite the addition of the weaker men’s faces, suggesting that the key factor was strength and not physiognomy.

“The Role of Physical Formidability in Human Social Status Allocation,” Aaron W. Lukaszewski, Zachary L. Simmons, Cameron Anderson and James R. Roney, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Dec. 14

 

Comment:

I was forwarded this article from “The Wall Street Journal”.  IMO, an interesting read, I had to share.  — More of a reason to go to the gym