Linux

HowTo Upgrade OpenMediaVault

Here are some quick and simple steps to upgrade your OpenMediaVault (OMV) to the latest version; OMV 1.0  (Kralizec).

SSH into your OpenMediaVault server; in my case I am running OMV 0.5 and run the following command:

apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade && omv-update

Then type the following command:

omv-release-upgrade

Once completed you can either restart the web services or reboot the system and your all set.

 

Monitoring Tor resource usage

A while back I wrote about how I setup a small yet effective Tor network proxy server titled “My Quick Tor Socks / Web Proxy“.

After running this for sometime now I wanted to get some real time status, but more than that I wanted it to look cool. And this brings me to what I recently found.

And that my friends is Arm:

The anonymizing relay monitor (arm) is a CLI status monitor for Tor. This functions much like top does for system usage, providing real time statistics for:

  • resource usage (bandwidth, cpu, and memory usage)
  • general relaying information (nickname, fingerprint, flags, or/dir/controlports)
  • event log with optional regex filtering and deduplication
  • connections correlated against tor’s consensus data (ip, connection types, relay details, etc)
  • torrc configuration file with syntax highlighting and validation

This is what I was looking for 100%, and even better most of the attributes of arm can be adjusted via a configuration file. For additional information check out the project page here: https://www.atagar.com/arm/

Wow “jermal’ that’s cool, how do I set this up.

It’s very simple just follow the steps below:

  • SSH in or go to your Console
  • Once logged in do an apt-get update
  • Then apt-get install tor-arm -y
  • That’s it, once installed your ready

To run arm all you need to do is type: arm

happy monitoring folks.
*you can even press ‘n’ for a new Tor identity at anytime*

My Quick TOR Socks / Web Proxy

I originally preformed similar steps to setup a raspberry pi for this reason, later using a very tiny Ubuntu server install.

  1. Using a clean Ubuntu / or / Debian installation (recommended, not necessary) add the following repositories to /etc/apt/sources.list: deb http://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org <DISTRIBUTION> main
  2. to figure out the name of your distribution. A quick command to run is lsb_release –c (Ubuntu) or cat /etc/debian_version (Debian)
  3. Next add the gpg key that was used to sign the TOR packages: gpg –keyserver keys.gnupg.net –recv 886DDD89
  4. Then, type sudo apt-get install deb.torproject.org-keyring
  5. Next type sudo apt-get update
  6. Next type apt-get install tor
  7. Once completed TOR will be installed and listening on port 9050 on 127.0.0.1 of the host. You will need to modify the following file /etc/tor/torrc and add your servers address and SOCKS Port to listen on.
  8. Once completed you can restart the tor service and test remotely with a machine on your network; assign a web browser the SOCKS proxy info for your server and test with: https://check.torproject.org/ if all working you will be notified that you are on the TOR network.

But what if you don’t want to use SOCKS or an application / device doesn’t have a configuration for SOCKS proxy?  Well I encounter this same thing and there is a fix for that.

Using privoxy you can proxy your data via the computers current network, a VPN tunnel and in our case a SOCKS proxy.

  1. Back onyour server type  sudo apt-get update , then sudo apt-get install privoxy
  2. Once installed you will need to edit the following file: /etc/privoxy/config
  3. You need to:
  4. add a listen address and port for your client machines to use.
  5. you need to setup a forward-socks5 connection, something like: forward-socks5  / 127.0.0.1:9050
  6. Restart the privoxy server and your good to test. As we did above, setup your web browser with the proxy settings and check the following address https://check.torproject.org/ all should be working and you have an always on TOR Network proxy.

For more info on TOR: https://www.torproject.org

 

How to Root Galaxy S4!

This is a video by our buddy Zedomax on rooting the Galaxy S4. This method is only for root access, its not a video on installing custom recovery, so please enjoy and remember to subscribe to his YouTube Channel.

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This method works on all Qualcomm Galaxy S4 running Android 4.2.2 including:
AT&T SGH-i337, T-Mobile SGH-M919, Sprint SPH-L720, Verizon, US Cellular, Telus, .
Rogers, etc…

For GT-i9500 octa-core S4, see other root method here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VZd71…

Download and Step-by-Step tutorial here:
http://galaxys4root.com/galaxy-s4-roo…

For rooting Galaxy S4 on Linux/Ubuntu, please see this video instead:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JIAbdV…
For rooting Galaxy S4 on Mac OSX, please see this video instead:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5Sluq…

For more awesome info on rooting the Galaxy S4 stop over at http://GalaxyS4Root.com

Using netcat to print header info from web browsers

You can identify what information is sent from the browser to the remote web server using a Linux tool called netcat (nc). Netcat is often referred to as a “Swiss-army knife for TCP/IP”. Its list of features includes port scanning, transferring files, and port listening, and it can be used as a backdoor.

Simply run netcat in listing mode on your desired port. Example: nc -l 8080. You can then point to address of this system http://ip_address:port and netcat will display the values received.

The following are some example of the output:

Google Chrome – Version 27.0.1453.116m:

GET / HTTP/1.1
Host: 10.255.255.10:8080
Connection: keep-alive
Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.2; WOW64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/27.0.1453.116 Safari/537.36
Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate,sdch
Accept-Language: en-US,en;q=0.8

 

Internet Explorer 10 – Version 10.0.9200.16599

GET / HTTP/1.1
Accept: text/html, application/xhtml+xml, */*
Accept-Language: en-US
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 10.0; Windows NT 6.2; WOW64; Trident/6.0)
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
Host: 10.255.255.10:8080
DNT: 1
Connection: keep-alive

 

Firefox – Version 21.0

GET / HTTP/1.1
Host: 10.255.255.10:8080
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.2; WOW64; rv:21.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/21.0
Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8
Accept-Language: en-US,en;q=0.5
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
Connection: keep-alive

 

Google Chrome (Android) – Version 27.0.1453.90

GET / HTTP/1.1
Host: 10.255.255.10:8080
Connection: keep-alive
Cache-Control: max-age=0
Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; Android 4.2.2; SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 Build/JDQ39) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/27.0.1453.90 Mobile Safari/537.36
Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate,sdch
Accept-Language: en-US,en;q=0.8