SharePoint

SharePoint Server 2016 IT Preview

The SharePoint Server 2016 preview is now available to download from the Microsoft website:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=48712

Note: Windows Server 2012 R2 is required

Brief on Install Instructions

  1. Review SharePoint Server system requirements
  2. Download and install full-featured software for a 180-day trial
  3. When prompted, use the following product key: NQTMW-K63MQ-39G6H-B2CH9-FRDWJ

Unable to open Office Documents, SharePoint 2013 On-Prem

 

We have recently encountered a strange issue where users get stuck on the Word, Excel, Powerpoint splash logo where it says “Contacting the server for information.”  We have spent several days on this issue and it seems to have impacted a large user base.

I am working with the team here to find a resolution and as soon as I know of one I will share.

–update–

We have tested this in several test, demo SharePoint 2013 deployments and are facing the same issue.

Here is something new:  When tested with SharePoint Online the issue does not exist { scratching my head }

Joined in on a thread about this issue, where others are also facing the same incident
Link:  https://community.office365.com/en-us/f/154/p/412623/1024983#1024983

–update–

Steps taken: with no resolution

  • Attempt to open from SharePoint on another piece of hardware or virtual machine with the same exact versions of Office including updates – issue does not occur
  • Logging in with another use, even when creating a new profile on same affected OS / Hardware install the issue occurs
  • Attempts to remove windows updates, office updates do not resolve the issue
  • Repair or Uninstall followed by reinstall of Office 2013 doesn’t resolve the issue
  • Tested with a new SharePoint 2013, including a pre install contoso installations, the issue occurs

Environments:

We have workstations running Windows 8.1, Windows 10 all having these issues.

Note:

  1. this issue has not affected users who are using Office 2016
  2. this issue has not affected users who using SharePoint Online

No much more is known about this issues cause. The only solution which works at this time is to clean install or system restore to a point prior to this issues occurrence

There is a possibility that an antivirus may be causing this issue the future of the anti virus causing it is still unknown.

*UPDATE*

In my case this incident was directly related to ESET and its filtering of HTTP requests. Disabling this filtering resolved the issue.

I must note that disabling all security isn’t the best choice so here is some info from ESET to help you filter out and white list requests to avoid such an issue

http://support.eset.com/kb939/

 

Renaming SharePoint 2013 Server

I spent sometime today renaming SharePoint 2013 Servers for a project I was pulled in on. It involved using PowerShell cmdlets and other administrative tasks.

The project required me to “Clone” SharePoint farm servers to make template environments for demonstration and development task.

I originally followed steps provided here: Renaming SharePoint then later streamlined the process so its something I found useful. Here are my notes saved in PowerShell format so it could be run step by step using PowerShell ISE:

 

Best,

Jermal

The Truth – Single Sign On with Outlook and Office 365

After many twists and turns on this bumpy road of setting up a Hybrid Deployment of Exchange Online with AD Sync and ADFS for SSO.  I am faced with yet another issue.

Let me tell you what does work with the single sign on:

  • Outlook via Web Access
  • Office 365 Portal
  • Office 365 SharePoint
  • Office 365 Yammer
  • Office 365 Web Apps
  • Office 365 Lync Online

For the most part any Office 365 web services offered using a web browser, as long as its Internet Explorer.

Missing from the above list of working items is Outlook! That’s right; Outlook doesn’t work.

In fact; users of Outlook will be prompted to enter their credentials on first use.  Let me break right here and describe first use.

First use is any time you open Outlook, you will be prompt for a password to log in.  Unless you save it.

In addition to having to save your password locally in the Windows Credential Manager, you will need to update this password which was saved each and every time you change your password.

This is not my understanding of what the term “Single Sign On” was to be. Good job to Microsoft’s Office 365 Marketing Team.  You had/have so many of us as believers.

At this time I am very disappointed about the Outlook prompts for password credentials. Perhaps they will fix in the future.

Research

I was able to find the following ADFS White Paper on Office 365 Single Sign-On with AD FS which should provide more details.

I also found info confirming that Outlook wasn’t designed to support Single Sign On.  It has even been quoted “The Office 365 experience for logging on to Microsoft Outlook connections is also not expected to be a single sign-on experience.”KB2535227 (A federated user is prompted unexpectedly to enter their credentials when they access an Office 365 resource)

I apologize for the somewhat rant; but felt I needed to share this before many of you waste a lot of time and investment on trying to get something like this working, to only find out one of the major reasons to use it doesn’t work.

Perhaps Microsoft should read the Internet more before misusing terms such as SSO.

“With SSO, a user logs in once and gains access to different applications, without the need to re-enter log-in credentials at each application.”

http://www.techopedia.com/definition/4106/single-sign-on-sso

Single sign-on (SSO) is a property of access control of multiple related, but independent software systems. With this property a user logs in once and gains access to all systems without being prompted to log in again at each of them.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_sign_on

Single signon takes away the need for the user to enter further authentications when switching from one application to another.”

http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/S/single_signon.html

Single sign-on (SSO) is mechanism whereby a single action of user authentication and authorization can permit a user to access all computers and systems where he has access permission, without the need to enter multiple passwords. Single sign-on reduces human error, a major component of systems failure and is therefore highly desirable but difficult to implement.

http://www.opengroup.org/security/sso/

– Jermal

SharePoint 2013: Upgrade to Claims Based Authentication

Claims-based authentication is an essential component to enable the advanced functionality of SharePoint 2013.

To move classic-mode web applications from SharePoint 2010 Products to SharePoint 2013, you can convert them to claims-based web applications within SharePoint 2010 Products, and then migrate them to SharePoint 2013.

The procedures in this post will address the issue I had faced after upgrading to SharePoint 2013 from 2010.

Due to classic mode authentication being officially depreciated by Microsoft, the database needed to be updated to claims based authentication.

During my testing; I noticed many (if not all) users accounts had issued logging into sites which worked prior to the upgrade.  I was removing and re adding them to work around this issue ; which was very tedious.

Using the Convert-SPWebApplication PowerShell command simplified this task.

Here are the steps I took

Launched SharePoint 2013 Management Shell as Administrator

Enter the following commands

Convert-SPWebApplication -Identity <URL> -To Claims -RetainPermissions

Please note the <URL> is the http://address to your SharePoint 2013 site application. Example: http://corp.jermsmit.com

For more info check out: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg251985.aspx