Ubuntu

Enabling Hyper-V for use on Windows 10

You all know when it comes to virtualization I am VMware all the way.  However, it has recently to my attention that the use of VMware Player on a company issued computer may be a violation of the EULA as this type of activity would be considered commercial use of the software.

So the option is to purchase a license or use the native Virtualization built into my Windows 10.

Ref: Workstation Player FAQs

  • Here are some capabilities of Windows 10 virtualization:
  • Hot add & remove for memory and network adapters: Windows and Linux Guests
  • Windows PowerShell Direct: Issue commands inside a virtual machine from the host
  • Linux secure boot:  – Ubuntu and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server can use secure boot options
  • Hyper-V Manager: Hyper-V manager can manage computers running Hyper-V on Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows 8.1

 

Prerequisites

The following prerequisites are required to successfully run Hyper-V on Windows 10:

Windows 10 Pro or Enterprise 64 bit Operating System
64 bit processor with Second Level Address Translation (SLAT)
4GB system RAM at minimum
BIOS-level Hardware Virtualization support

 

Windows 10 Hyper-V Install Steps:

  1. Enable virtualization support in bios
  2. Access the Control Panel
  3. From Control Panel select Programs
  4. In Windows Features select Hyper-V
  5. After installation of Hyper-V has completed, restart computer

The installation of Hyper-V is now complete.  The next step is to setup the Virtual Switch Manager for networking and configure your first virtual machine. This is can be done by:

  1. Clicking the search icon on the task-bar and then typing Hyper-V Manager .
  2. Select Virtual Switch Manager in the Actions pane
  3. Choose External and then click on the Create Virtual Switch button
  4. Give the new Virtual Switch a name, and ensure the active NIC is selected

 

Install Microsoft SQL on Linux – Ubuntu Server

I recently had the pleasure of installing Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – Ubuntu Server. This was a very straight-forward installed and just works. The following steps are what were taken to install and configure this server.

My Setup:

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Server – VMware Template
  • Network Connectivity
  • SQL Server Management Studio 17 – Testing connectivity to SQL Server

Prerequisites:

  • Ubuntu Linux Server – Memory: 3.25, Disk Space: 6GB, CPU (x64): 2 Cores
  • Internet Access – Offline Installs are also possible
  • Root or SU Access
  • Time – 5-6 Minutes

Steps:

  1. Log into Ubuntu Linux server via console or SSH (Preferred), su into root
  2. We need to import the repository GPG Keys by first downloading and adding it with he following command: curl https://packages.microsoft.com/keys/microsoft.asc | sudo apt-key add –
  3. Next we register the repository by entering: add-apt-repository “$(curl https://packages.microsoft.com/config/ubuntu/16.04/mssql-server-2017.list)”
  4. Next we need to upload the repository list and install SQL with the following commands: apt update | apt install mssql-server -y
  5. After the SQL Server package has completed installing.  You will be instructed to run mssql-config setup to setup the SQL Server version you will be installing, in addition to password credentials.  This is done by issue the following command: /opt/mssql/bin/mssql-conf setup
  6. Optional – Open your firewall if enabled to allow for SQL’s TCP/1433 from remote hosts.
  7. Test connecting to your newly install SQL Server via SSMS.
  8. Done!

Screenshot:

Video:

OpenVPN Access Server on Ubuntu

I recently retired my OpenVPN Turnkey appliance and needed to get my VPN solution up and running again. I decided to go with installing OpenVPN Access Server on a clean install of Ubuntu Server to create a stable and lightweight Virtual Private Network (VPN) to access my network.

I chose to go with OpenVPN AS because it’s using the OpenVPN I know and trust, but it also has the value-added feature of an administrative server used for user and access management.

Setup is straight forward after a few small prerequisites are established.

Requirements:

  • Ubuntu Server – Running the latest version and updates. I am using 16.04.2-as my base
  • Root or possibly sudo access

Software:

Download the latest release of the OpenVPN AS Server
https://openvpn.net/index.php/access-server/download-openvpn-as-sw.html

The direct Ubuntu installs here

 

The following steps can be used to download and install:

  1. Download the install package: wget http://swupdate.openvpn.org/as/openvpn-as-2.1.9-Ubuntu16.amd_64.deb
  2. Install the downloaded package: dpkg -i openvpn-as-2.1.9-Ubuntu16.amd_64.deb
  3. Change the password for the openvpn user: passwd openvpn

When the installation has completed, the Access Server web UIs will be available here:
Admin UI: https://<yourip>:943/admin
Client UI: https://<yourip>:943/

 

And just like that you now can take better control over your privacy, security.

Note: I did not go over the configuration of OpenVPN AS, I may do this in another post. I just wanted to run through the steps of getting this software installed.

 

Here is a short video on ‘what a VPN is’ – Thank you Qusai

Ubuntu Linux for Windows 10 Released On Windows App Store

We can now get Ubuntu Linux for Windows 10 from the Windows App Store. Hows that for an amazing new feature. Simply open the Windows store and search for “Ubuntu”. I would be remiss if i didn’t mention that Windows Insiders Members get first go at this new application.

Also to note that this is not a full version of the Linux Operating System “Ubuntu”. This application is mainly utilizing terminal via bash with included gui-less utilities such as  ssh, git, apt, etc…

  • Navigate to Control Panel > Program and Features
  • Select Turn Windows features on or off
  • Select Windows Subsystems for Linux and Click OK
  • Reboot

 

 

 

My eth0 is now called eno16777736

Interesting and new to me is that my network interface which was known to be called eth0 is now called eno16777736 in my new installs.

The following document indicates that 16777736 is the device’s acpi_index as provided by the firmware (BIOS/EFI)

This seems to happen on my VMware hosts where I’ve installed the latest Ubuntu OS releases. I am still looking into why this is happening and will update as soon as I have a better understanding.

For now, here is some info I found:

What does “eno” stand for?

en is for Ethernet
o is for on-board
The number is a firmware/BIOS provided index.