VMware

Install VMware Tools Windows Server 2016 Core

I just completed my install of Windows Server 2016 Core as a guest in my VMware Lab. Now that this has been completed the next step is for me to install the VMware tools so that I can take advantage of various features; specifically, template deployment with customization options

About:VMware:Tools: VMware software tools enhance the performance of the guest operating system and improve the management of the virtual machine guests operating systems.

How to install:

  1. Select your VM from vCenter and select ‘Guest OS > Install VMware Tools
    This mounts the VMware CD Image containing the installation files
  2. Inside the guest machine type ‘powershell’
    This will drop you from the command shell to powershell prompt
  3. Next type the command Get-PSDrive
    This will return the drives attached to the system
  4. Change to the drive that the VMware tools are currently mounted
    In my case, this was drive letter “D”
  5. Issue the command .\setup64.exe to start the install process

    Note: issuing just setup.exe or setup64.exe will end in an error as Windows poweshell does not load commands such as this by default 
  6. Follow the steps of the VMware tools installer and restart when completed.

 

Ref: http://jermsmit.com/howto-install-vmware-tools-on-windows-server-2102-r2-server-core/

vSphere 6.5: OVF Import – The provided manifest file is invalid

Importing a template from vSphere 5.5 and importing to vSphere 6.5 the following error was encountered: The provided manifest file is invalidInvalid OVF checksum algorithm: SHA1

To get fix this error the following steps were taken:

Step 1 – is to extract your ova template (after all its only a zip)

You will notice 3 files once extracted

*.vmdk – is your disk containing all your data

*.ovf – is the configuration (also the file that we will edit)

*.mf – is a manifest containing a reference to the vmdk and ovf, also holding a SHA1 hash which ESXi will check for validation. This file needs to be deleted as we are making a change to the ovf and this will surely break that hash.

Example of what the contents of the .mf file looks like:

SHA1(template.ovf)= 908e804f140ffa58083b8bd154dace330b440c78
SHA1(template-disk1.vmdk)= 29c2d44d908d0207005360dabb58967f01a1

Step 2 – Delete the file with the *.mf extension. If this exists ESXi will attempt to validate and throw an error about the templates integrity being invalid. Once this has been deleted you can deploy your OVF Template.

Ref: http://jermsmit.com/unmount-local-iso-before-making-it-an-ovf-template/

Happy Importing

vSphere Customization Specification and Ubuntu 17.10

Has anyone noticed issues with #vSphere Customization Specification and #Ubuntu 17.10 (GNU/Linux 4.13.0-25-generic x86_64) – Now that the network settings are located in: /etc/netplan/01-netcfg.yaml, I’m back to manually updating IP information (Server Naming still works).

Although the traditional /etc/network/interfaces reflects the information provided by the customization process, the host still acquires a DHCP issued address. After some digging I was able to find out that this information was no longer being referenced and is now being pulled from:/etc/netplan/01-netcfg.yaml

Here are the IP configuration details

/etc/network/interfaces:

/etc/netplan/01-netcfg.yaml:

Cannot remediate host because it is part of HA Admission Control enabled Cluster

Recently my team and I ran into incident with and error while patching esxi servers using VMware Update Manager(VUM).  When attempting o remediate the following error message was shown:

“cannot remediate host because it is part of HA Admission Control enabled Cluster”

Cause:

vCenter Server uses admission control to ensure that sufficient resources are available in a cluster to provide failover protection and to ensure that virtual machine resource reservations are respected.

Admission control imposes constraints on resource usage and any action that would violate these constraints is not permitted. If an automated process needs to take actions, it might temporarily violate the failover constraints.

 

Solution:

Before patching of the ESXi Servers that are part of the HA Cluster, make sure you have disabled “Admission Control”. Once server has been patched you can re-enable Admission Control on the cluster.

 

Steps to disable Admission Control

  • Right-click the cluster and click Edit Settings.
  • Under Cluster Features, click VMware HA.
  • Under Admission Control, select Disable: Power on VMs that violate availability constraints.
  • Click OK

This can also be disabled in the VMware Update Manager remediation wizard. When you remediate check the option “Disable High Availability admission control if it is enabled for any of the selected clusters.

 

Hyper-V Virtualization: Turning Hyper-V On and Off

I recently started using Hyper-V on my Windows 10 workstation to task advantage of using technologies such as Docker that leverages Hyper-V to run its container images.  I also run VMware Player for running virtual machines.

The following commands make it a simpler task to toggle Hyper-V on and off again.

To Turn Hyper-V off, run the following command then restart your computer:

bcdedit /set hypervisorlaunchtype off

To turn Hyper-V back on, run the following command then restart your computer:

bcdedit /set hypervisorlaunchtype on (or auto start)

 

Note:  Quick method to check the status of Hyper-V – Get-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName *hyper*