VMware

HowTo: Export VMware vSphere Sessions

I moved myself to a new workstation and followed my previous steps to export my putty sessions.  This time around I am exporting my Virtual Infrastructure Client settings

  1. From the run prompt (shortcut keys: WinKey+R) enter regedit,, this opens the registry editor
  2. Locate the following branch: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\VMware
  3. On the File menu, click Export
  4. In File name, enter a name for the registry file.
  5. Choose a location to save the file; You can now copy this file and import your the sessions data on the new system.

This saves me a lot of time.

 

 

I hope you enjoyed this post, thanks for visiting – jermal

Tech Short Q&A: What is a Hypervisor?

It’s interesting that this classification isn’t new. In fact it was classified by Gerald J. Popek back in 1974 in the article “Formal Requirements for Virtualizable Third Generation Architectures”

So to answer the question:

A hypervisor is a hardware virtualization technique which allows multiple guest operating systems to run on a single host system hardware at the same time. Each guess operating system share the hardware its host. Hardware such as processor, memory as if it is its own.

Type 1 Hypervisors are known as bare-metal. These run directly on the host hardware and have full control of the hardware resources while managing guest operating systems.

Type 2 Hypervisors are hosted and run within a host operating systems environment to provide virtualization resources

Examples of Type 1 Hypervisors include: VMware ESXi, Citrix XenServer, Microsoft Hyper-V, KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) on Linux.

Examples of Type 2 Hypervisors include: VMware Workstation / Player / Fusion, Sun VirtualBox, Parallels

 

I hope you enjoyed this #techshort and thanks for visiting – jermal

Back on vCenter in my home lab

Oh yeah; anyone else have the warm fuzzy feeling right now; Hashtags: #‎VMware‬ ‪#‎vCenter‬ ‪#‎ESXi‬

 

All in my home lab. Once again I have the management capabilities over systems that I prefer. VMware vCenter 6 is awesome and I am in love with the web interface

Next — Storage upgrade 3.0. That will be 16TB of usable RAID10 storage


There will be NFS, iSCSI and DLNA, and SAMBA

Power Off & On VMware Guest with a Scheduled Task

 

Using Windows task scheduler you can schedule power off and on events for guest systems running in VMware vCenter or a standalone ESXi host.

My steps:

  1. Create a basic task – give it a name and description (optional)
  2. Choose when you want this task to stat
  3. Select the start date and time
  4. Choose “Start a program”
  5. Choose the program you would like to run.  In this setup we will be running the following:
  6. C:\WINDOWS\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe -NoLogo -NonInteractive -File “C:\work\task\jermsmit.ps1”

     
  7. Click Next, Select Yes when Task Scheduler prompts you
  8. On the Finish screen, click Finish  – You can open properties to set this to run unattended

 

The script I am now using does the following:

  1. Loads the VMware PowerCli modules to powershell
  2. Connects to Specified ESXi or vCenter Server
  3. Issues a stop to specific VM Guests
  4. Issues a start to the VM Guest

Script Example:

 

Use cases:

  1. Powering systems down to conserve energy (earth day initiative)
  2. Allow for systems with large workloads to have full system resources without contention during scheduled down periods of the systems that are offline.
  3. Quick restore of nonpersistant environments

 

Thanks for visiting – jermal

VMware vSphere PowerCLI – Power Off & On Guests

Looking for a method to restart a non-persistent environment in ESXi or vCenter, I was able to use PowerCLI to issue the commands needed. Originally I was looking to automate the recovery of a snapshot when it dawned on me that a non-persistent disk would facilitate the same thing.  However I would need to power off the server and back on again for it to work.

And this is what came from my searching and trial and error

Powering Off

Powering On

Both – Power Off wait then Power On

Next was to use a batch file to run a task to execute the PowerCLI commands. This was done by doing the following set as a scheduled task

 Thanks Hristo for your help