VMware

vSphere 6.5 release notes & download links

 

This weekend I had the fun of getting my hands and feet wet with installs of VMware’s ESXi 6.5 and vCenter 6.5. The links below should be useful to any of you looking to learn about the new release and download bits to install.

Release Notes:

Downloads:

Documentation:

VMware vCenter 6 Phantom Snapshots

I’ve been using vCenter 6 for a while now and noticed an odd issue pertaining to snapshots. It seems that all guest show a “revert to current snapshot” state even if a snapshot does not actually exist.

However viewing under the Snapshot Manger… shows no existing snapshots associated with the virtual machine guests.

I’ve noticed this this issue does not exist when using the vSphere Web Client.

These symptoms have been confirmed by VMware official in the following KB: https://kb.vmware.com/kb/2111363

For now there are no resolution steps…

Symptom Recap:

  • There are no snapshots on virtual machine(s).
  • Virtual machines show Revert to current snapshot (right-click on the virtual machine > Snapshot > Revert to current snapshot) enabled in vSphere Client when connected to the vCenter Server 6.0.
  • When viewing the Snapshot Manager (right-click on the virtual machine > Snapshot > Snapshot Manager) for the virtual machine in the vSphere Client, there are no snapshots present.
  • Directly logging into the ESXi host using the vSphere Client shows the Revert to current snapshot grayed out.
  • Creating and deleting a snapshot does not resolve this issue.
  • In the vSphere Web Client Revert to current snapshot appears grayed out.

Work around: 

  1. Ignore the vSphere Client results and use the vSphere Web Client
  2. Use PowerCli to display snapshots.

Example command I like to use:

 

ntopng on Ubuntu 14.04

I just completed my ntopNG appliance setup. Once more I can look into my network traffic to get an idea of what’s going on.

Below you will find the steps to complete the install

Here are the steps

Log into the ubuntu server host and issue the following commands:

  1. sudo into root: sudo -i
  2. wget http://www.nmon.net/apt-stable/14.04/all/apt-ntop-stable.deb
  3. dpkg -i apt-ntop-stable.deb
  4. apt-get update
  5. apt-get -y install pfring nprobe ntopng ntopng-data n2disk nbox
  6. service apache2 restart

The steps provided here are the official ntop.org directions for their stable build packages.

Please note you will need to have a management and monitoring interface for your configuration.

In my configuration, I will be listening on a mirrored port to capture network traffic to be displayed under ntopNG

 

Are you interested in learning more about Ubuntu.  Check out the following book:  Ubuntu Unleashed 2016 Edition

Deploy Template Using VMware Guest Customization Specification

Using templates save you lots of time when it comes to deploying virtual machines. And if you are looking to get a slight edge on your deployments in lab or production using customization specifications may be the way you want to go.

Here are some quick steps to deploy using this method:

 

  1. From the home page of  vCenter Web click VMs and Templates
  2. Right click on the template of choice and select New VM from Template…
  3. Enter the name of your virtual machine guest as you would refer to it in vCenter. Choose your datacenter and click Next to continue
  4. If you are using clusters, choose your cluster and click Next to continue
  5. Select your datastore and click Next
  6. On the select clone option screen choose customise the operating system option; you may also set the machine to power on after creation to start the process which customises the guest – Click Next to continue
  7. On our last screen we are shown our customization choices.  Choose your template configuration and click next
  8. Clicking Next on the confirmation screen start our deployment

And that’s all folks  — posted this for a friend with screenshots to illustrate the process.

– Jermal

My eth0 is now called eno16777736

Interesting and new to me is that my network interface which was known to be called eth0 is now called eno16777736 in my new installs.

The following document indicates that 16777736 is the device’s acpi_index as provided by the firmware (BIOS/EFI)

This seems to happen on my VMware hosts where I’ve installed the latest Ubuntu OS releases. I am still looking into why this is happening and will update as soon as I have a better understanding.

For now, here is some info I found:

What does “eno” stand for?

en is for Ethernet
o is for on-board
The number is a firmware/BIOS provided index.