Windows 10

Microsoft: Meltdown and Spectre Check via PowerShell

Like many folks around the world, I was wondering if this Meltdown and Spectre flaw would impact my computers and virtual machines.  Microsoft has started to release emergency fixes for Windows 10 and its been said that Windows 8 and legacy 7 will also receive patches.

Microsoft has released a PowerShell script that lets users check whether they have protection in place.

Steps to take:

  1. Open PowerShell (I like to use PowerShell ISE)
  2. Run PowerShell as as Administrator.
  3. Type Install-Module SpeculationControl and press Enter.
  4. When the installation completes, type Import-Module SpeculationControl and press Enter.
  5. Type Get-SpeculationControlSettings and press Enter.

In the list of results that’s displayed, you’re looking to see that a series of protections are enabled — this will be listed as True.  Ref: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4073119/protect-against-speculative-execution-side-channel-vulnerabilities-in

Should reassemble 

Speculation control settings for CVE-2017-5715 [branch target injection]

  • Hardware support for branch target injection mitigation is present: True
  • Windows OS support for branch target injection mitigation is present: True
  • Windows OS support for branch target injection mitigation is enabled: True

Speculation control settings for CVE-2017-5754 [rogue data cache load]

  • Hardware requires kernel VA shadowing: True
  • Windows OS support for kernel VA shadow is present: True
  • Windows OS support for kernel VA shadow is enabled: True
  • Windows OS support for PCID optimization is enabled: True

 

 

 

Change Screen Resolution for a Ubuntu Hyper-V Virtual Machine

Just finished installed Ubuntu as a Windows 10, Hyper-V guest.  I went to modify the video settings and noticed them to be locked in place.  After some searching; Thank you Google… Found the solution that worked for me.

Ref: Ben Armstrong’s Virtualization Blog

Steps to change screen resolution:

  1. Open Terminal
  2. Type: sudo nano /etc/default/grub
  3. Find the line starting with GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT, and add video=hyperv_fb:[the resolution you want]. The resolution I want is 1280×720. So my line ends up looking like this: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT=”quiet splash video=hyperv_fb:1280×720″
  4. Write the changes (Ctrl X)
  5. Run: sudo update-grub
  6. Reboot the virtual machine

When you return from your restart you will have the resolution you applied in the grub config.

 

 

 

Enabling Hyper-V for use on Windows 10

You all know when it comes to virtualization I am VMware all the way.  However, it has recently to my attention that the use of VMware Player on a company issued computer may be a violation of the EULA as this type of activity would be considered commercial use of the software.

So the option is to purchase a license or use the native Virtualization built into my Windows 10.

Ref: Workstation Player FAQs

  • Here are some capabilities of Windows 10 virtualization:
  • Hot add & remove for memory and network adapters: Windows and Linux Guests
  • Windows PowerShell Direct: Issue commands inside a virtual machine from the host
  • Linux secure boot:  – Ubuntu and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server can use secure boot options
  • Hyper-V Manager: Hyper-V manager can manage computers running Hyper-V on Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows 8.1

 

Prerequisites

The following prerequisites are required to successfully run Hyper-V on Windows 10:

Windows 10 Pro or Enterprise 64 bit Operating System
64 bit processor with Second Level Address Translation (SLAT)
4GB system RAM at minimum
BIOS-level Hardware Virtualization support

 

Windows 10 Hyper-V Install Steps:

  1. Enable virtualization support in bios
  2. Access the Control Panel
  3. From Control Panel select Programs
  4. In Windows Features select Hyper-V
  5. After installation of Hyper-V has completed, restart computer

The installation of Hyper-V is now complete.  The next step is to setup the Virtual Switch Manager for networking and configure your first virtual machine. This is can be done by:

  1. Clicking the search icon on the task-bar and then typing Hyper-V Manager .
  2. Select Virtual Switch Manager in the Actions pane
  3. Choose External and then click on the Create Virtual Switch button
  4. Give the new Virtual Switch a name, and ensure the active NIC is selected

 

Microsoft Patched the KRACK Vulnerability Last Week

Last week, Microsoft released an update Windows 10 Cumulative Update KB4041676. Guess what was also included within this… Yup! The Patch for the Krack Vulnerability.  At this time the KRACK vulnerability that was not publicly disclosed, until Monday, October 16 2017.

Very slick move on the part of Microsoft slipping this in to protect its customers against such a threat.  For those who dig deep into the updates notes would have arrived at Microsoft’s Security TechCenter post which reads.

“A spoofing vulnerability exists in the Windows implementation of wireless networking. An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could potentially replay broadcast and/or multicast traffic to hosts on a WPA or WPA 2-protected wireless network.”

For the post and affected Microsoft products:
https://portal.msrc.microsoft.com/en-US/security-guidance/advisory/CVE-2017-13080

 

Windows 10 Cumulative Update KB4041676 Fixed

On Tuesday, October 10, 2017 Microsoft released KB4041676 as an update that includes quality improvements. What many started to notice was that it was accompanied by an issue included systems unable to boot and those cause in boot-loops.

 

Jump to quick fix: for those of you who already installed this

In the cmd line of the advanced repair options type:

Dism /Image:C:\ /Get-Packages (could be any drive, had it on D, F, and E.)
Dism /Image:C:\ /Remove-Package /PackageName:package_ for_###
(no space between package_ and for)

Remove every update that’s pending – There are 3 updates that are causing the issue they are:

  • Rollupfix_wrapper~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~14393.1770.1.6
  • Rollupfix~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~14393.1770.1.6
  • Rollupfix~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~14393.1715. 1.10

 

Microsoft explained in a support article that this has been caused by what it describes as a “publishing issue,”

““We have corrected the publishing issue as of the afternoon of October 10th and have validated the cumulative security updates. We recommend all customers take these cumulative security updates,”.

 

At the office and in the lab:

I have taken steps to flush the update from my WSUS environments as a precaution and to allow for the corrected package to be downloaded.

 

ref:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-ca/help/4049094/windows-devices-may-fail-to-boot-after-installing-october-10-version-o