To lower my memory footprint in my home lab I decided to move from into Windows Server 2016 Core.  That said running Active Directory Domain Service seems to be the perfect candidate to start with my new architectured lab environment.

There are several prerequisites required for enabling ADDS, but I am not going to get into those here as if your reading this, there is a good chance you already know what those are.

We will be installing what is commonly referred to as a new forest/domain.

Step 1: Validate your hostname, IP address, and DNS settings

  1. Log into the console of your Windows Server 2016 Core System
    You need to log in as an administrator and should arrive at a command prompt
  2. Enter the command Sconfig and press enter
    The Server Configuration tool interface should be displayed
  3. Use the setting options to validate your host’s configuration

 

Step 2:  Installing Domain Services 

  1. From the Windows Server 2016 Core command prompt type: powershell then press enter.
    This will change your shell mode to PowerShell allowing you to use additional commands.
  2. Type Install-WindowsFeature AD-Domain-Services -IncludeManagementTools
    This will install the ADDS roles on the Windows Server 2016 Core System
  3. When completed type: Install-ADDSForest -DomainName yourdomain.tld
    Here is where you choose the name of your domain to be installed.
  4. You will be required to provide a recovery password, please enter one and take note of it
  5. Next, you will be asked to confirm the pending changes and allow the server host to be restarted
    Click yes to continue
  6. Your server will be restarted and return as a Domain Controller

 

Step 3: Validate DC Services

  1. From the Windows Server 2016 Core command prompt type: powershell then press enter.
    This will change your shell mode to PowerShell allowing you to use additional commands.
  2. Issue the following command line: Get-Service adws,kdc,netlogon,dns
    This will return details on the installed services 
  3. Issue the command Get-SmbShare
    This returns details about available shares, specifically the systvol and netlogon shares
  4. Use the get-eventlog command to review logs
    Example: get-eventlog “Directory Service” | select entrytype, source, eventid, message