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How-To: install VMware .bundle on Ubuntu

By now many I have come accustom to installing programs using the apt-get method in Ubuntu, but there comes a time where we need to remember those other commands to install things.  For example when attempting to install software packaged in .bundle file format.

It all started when I downloaded VMware player and went to install the .bundle.  I wasn’t sure at that time what to do with it.  A Google search later I had my answer; and I hope Google got you to this page where I also share with you how-to do this.

In Ubuntu you open your command line terminal and type the following:

sudo sh VMware- ‘press tab to auto complete’

That’s it…   Follow the instructions and you are finished.

Vyatta Network Stats (NTOP) Install

I don’t have much to say here, other than I wanted to see something real time or close to it about how the traffic is flowing on my Vyatta Router so I looked for some info and found it.  I am sharing it here for others and future reference on my own part.

The first thing you must know is that to install NTOP you will need full root access.  The default vyatta user account will not permit you to do this install.  Please refer to a previous post of mine on how to enable root access in vyatta.

In addition to the above you will need to also give your vyatta router a public DNS server to use so it can download the necessary packages.  This is done by entering the configuration and typing ~# set system name-server 8.8.8.8 as you can see I used Google’s public name server.

And now on to the installation steps:

vyatta@vyatta:~$ configure
[edit]

vyatta@vyatta# set system package repository lenny components main
vyatta@vyatta# set system package repository lenny url http://http.us.debian.org/debian
vyatta@vyatta# set system package repository lenny distribution lenny
vyatta@vyatta# commit
vyatta@vyatta# save
vyatta@vyatta# su –

vyatta:~# aptitude update

vyatta:~# aptitude install ntop tcpd

vyatta:~# ntop -A
Please enter the password for the admin user: **********
Please enter the password again: **********

vyatta:~# /etc/init.d/ntop start

vyatta:~# /etc/init.d/ntop stop

vyatta:~# killall ntop

vyatta:~# update-rc.d -f ntop remove

vyatta:~# update-rc.d ntop defaults 99 99

When done you should be able to connect to http://routers-ip:3000
From what I noticed the interface which will be listened on will be the external (eth0_) while you connect to the internal (eth1_).

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Welcome to Google Voice

Google Voice, the popular and often controversial VoIP, voicemail, and messaging service from Mountain View search giant Google is now open for anyone in the U.S. to use. Previously, you could only open a Google Voice account if you received an invitation from a user already participating in the program.

Quote from the people at Google:

“We’re proud of the progress we’ve made with Google Voice over the last few years, and we’re still just scratching the surface of what’s possible when you combine your regular phone service with the latest web technology. It’s even more amazing to think about how far communication has come over the last couple hundred years”

To sign up for Google Voice, click here

Here are some things you can do to get started with Google Voice:

  1. Read transcriptions of voicemails. Watch a video »
  2. Customize which phones ring. Watch a video »
  3. Personalize greetings for different callers. Watch a video »
  4. Make cheap international calls. Watch a video »
  5. Forward SMS to email. Watch a video »
  6. Share voicemails with friends. Watch a video »
  7. Block unwanted callers. Watch a video »
  8. Screen callers before answering. Watch a video »
  9. Access the mobile app on your phone. Watch a video »
  10. Conference call with co-workers. Watch a video »
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Google SSL – Privacy I believe in

Today I got wind of a new beta from Google.  Google search over SSL.  Now you can have an end to end search that is encrypted between your computer and our friends over at Google.  This will protect your search terms and results from third parties such as your ISP, or company network admins who may be monitoring your search terms.   Stop over at https://www.google.com and give it a try.  Note:  HTTPS is for secure.

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