Windows 10

Mount NFS Share in Windows 10

Where is a need, there is a how-to do it for my friends.  Today it’s mounting of a NFS Share via Windows 10

Install the NFS Client (Services for NFS)
The first thing we need to do is install the NFS Client which can be done by following the steps below:

Step 1: Open Programs and Features.

Step 2: Click Turn Windows features on or off.

Step 3: Scroll down and check the option Services for NFS, then click OK

Step 4: Once installed, click Close and exit back to the desktop.

How to Mount an NFS Share
From the Windows Machine, Open the Command Prompt or Power Shell Prompt type the following command:

mount -o anon \\host-ip\nfs-share-name drive-letter:

The share is now mounted and we can access the data by navigating to the X: drive.
To validate your successful mount you can use the following command “mount” to review your connected mount points

 

How to: Disable the Windows Store

 

One of the features of Windows 10, is the Windows Store.  The Windows Store is a digital distribution platform for Microsoft Windows. It started as an app store for Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 as the primary means of distributing Universal Windows Platform apps.

Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Store_(digital)

As system configurators and administrators, this may be problematic as it introduces new configuration that was not expected or supported by the IT Staff.  To mitigate this the following steps can be used to disable the Windows Store.

This can be disabled via local group policy or via active directory domain services group policy.

Type gpedit in the search bar to find and start Group Policy Editor.

In the console tree of the snap-in, click Computer Configuration, click Administrative Templates, click Windows Components, and then click Store.

In the Setting pane, click Turn off Store application and then click Edit policy setting.

On the Turn off Store application setting page, click Enabled, and then click OK.

 

Considerations:

These policies are applicable to users of the Enterprise and Education editions only. ref: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/3135657/can-t-disable-windows-store-in-windows-10-pro-through-group-policy

 

How to delay the Windows 10 Spring Creators Update

As we edge ever nearer to the release of the Windows 10 Spring Creators Update, we must pause and think about what could possibly break in the process.  That said, it’s a good practice to allow yourself time to test these things before deploying out to your company.

Here are steps you can take locally – or via Active Directory Domain Services (ADDS) – Group Policy to defer the updates until a later time.

Requirement:  A version of Windows supporting the ability to defer feature updates

  • Windows 10 Pro
  • Windows 10 Enterprise 
  • Windows 10 Education

 

Steps:

  1. Open the Group Policy Editor (Local Windows) or Group Policy Management (for ADDS)
  2. Navigate to the following folder: Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Update > Defer Windows Updates
  3. Double-click on “Select when Feature Updates are received” to open the policy setting. First thing you need to do is set the policy to enabled. This activates the options that are provided.
  4. Click on Enable
  5. Select the branch readiness level for the feature updates you want to receive – Current Branch
  6. Choose the number of days to defer receiving the updates.  – 90 days works for me

Ref: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/deployment/update/waas-configure-wufb

 

VMware, Windows 10 Customization Specification Not Completing

Here are details of my setup – in fact, I started over from scratch to document my steps.
This seems to be a new problem occurring with Windows 10, version 1709

 

Install of new VMware guest for the purpose of being a template

  1. Create new VM, named it windows_10_enterprise_version_1703
  2. Remove floppy drive
  3. Uncheck networking (for install)
  4. Mount ISO and enable, click OK to save settings

Install of OS on the guest virtual machine

  1. Boot newly created VM (windows_10_enterprise_version_1703)
  2. Step through the installation until completion
  3. Complete language settings to arrive at Windows desktop
  4. Enable the ‘Administrator’ account as its disabled by default
  5. Log out of installation user (the account I named ‘install’)
  6. Log into the ‘Administrator’ account
  7. Enter control panel, user and delete the ‘install’ user account.
  8. Install VMWare tools, Reboot once
  9. Shutdown

 

Prepare VM to be a template

  1. Edit the VM settings
  2. Connect networking
  3. Disconnect CD Drive
  4. Click OK
  5. Convert VM to a Template

 

Customization Specification Setup

  1. Create new specification, (I named mine Windows Desktop – DHCP)
  2. Applied registration information
  3. Computer Name – Use the virtual machine name
  4. Windows License – Left this blank (unchecked include server licensing information)
  5. Administrator Password – Set password, choose the option to automatically login as Administrator
  6. Time Zone – Set my desired time zone
  7. Run Once – Left this blank (blank for now, later intend on applying KMS details)
  8. Network – Use standard network setting (DHCP)
  9. Workgroup or Domain – For now just Workgroup and left workgroup name as ‘WORKGROUP’
  10. Operating System Options – Generate New Security ID (SID)
  11. Ready to complete – Clicked OK

Deploying template

  1. Right-click on the template – New VM from the template
  2. Gave a simple name – TEST01
  3. Selected Datacenter, Selected Cluster
  4. Selected Storage
  5. Selected Options (Customize VM) and (Power on the virtual machine after creation)
  6. Selected ‘Windows Desktop – DHCP’ from customized guest OS options
  7. Clicked Next, then Finish and wait …

 

Where things get stuck

  1. After the first boot, the guest gets an IP address from the network
  2. Customization starts in the background and system reboots
  3. When the system resumes I arrive at the following screen
  4. The system customization never completes, and I find my VM’s stuck at the “Let’s start with region …” screen

And, I’ll update this as soon as I find a solution, but for now…  I’m stuck

Log Shared via Pastebin:  https://pastebin.com/ETpuLX3U

 

Update: March 18, 2018

I’ve had others also test this using the latest ISO for Windows 10 – en_windows_10_enterprise_version_1703_updated_march_2017_x86_dvd, they too now encounter this same issue.  So the problem seems to be with the build of Windows 10 that was released.

I am going to download another build from MSDN and see if there is a change.

 

Update: March 19, 2018

I was able to get this working by way of reinstalling Windows 10 using the following ISO build: en_windows_10_multi-edition_vl_version_1709_updated_sept_2017_x64_dvd

Was even able to apply Windows updates and redeploy without error.

 

Hyper-V Virtualization: Turning Hyper-V On and Off

I recently started using Hyper-V on my Windows 10 workstation to task advantage of using technologies such as Docker that leverages Hyper-V to run its container images.  I also run VMware Player for running virtual machines.

The following commands make it a simpler task to toggle Hyper-V on and off again.

To Turn Hyper-V off, run the following command then restart your computer:

bcdedit /set hypervisorlaunchtype off

To turn Hyper-V back on, run the following command then restart your computer:

bcdedit /set hypervisorlaunchtype on (or auto start)

 

Note:  Quick method to check the status of Hyper-V – Get-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName *hyper*