News

Bluetooth, NFC, and Wireless Safety

Bluetooth, NFC, and Wireless Safety – Day 6 – 30 Day Security Challenge – TekThing

Turn off Bluetooth. Turn off NFC. Turn off auto connect to known wireless access points. Forget networks you don’t normally connect to.

Today’s Video and Shownotes: https://snubsie.com/day-6

The Whole Challenge: https://snubsie.com/30-day-security-c…

Introducing Re:scam

 

Re:scam is an initiative aimed at helping people from becoming fraud victims by occupying the time and resources of scammers through deploying a well-educated artificially intelligent chat bot. Instead of junking or deleting a scam email, you can now forward it to Re:scam who will continue the conversation indefinitely – or until the scammer stops replying.

Re:scam can take on multiple personas, imitating real human tendencies with humor and grammatical errors, and can engage with infinite scammers at once, meaning it can continue an email conversation for as long as possible. Re:scam will turn the table on scammers by wasting their time, and ultimately damage the profits for scammers.

So the next time you get sent a scam email FORWARD it me@rescam.org

Meet the bot that stops scammers by wasting their time. https://www.rescam.org

 

Microsoft Patched the KRACK Vulnerability Last Week

Last week, Microsoft released an update Windows 10 Cumulative Update KB4041676. Guess what was also included within this… Yup! The Patch for the Krack Vulnerability.  At this time the KRACK vulnerability that was not publicly disclosed, until Monday, October 16 2017.

Very slick move on the part of Microsoft slipping this in to protect its customers against such a threat.  For those who dig deep into the updates notes would have arrived at Microsoft’s Security TechCenter post which reads.

“A spoofing vulnerability exists in the Windows implementation of wireless networking. An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could potentially replay broadcast and/or multicast traffic to hosts on a WPA or WPA 2-protected wireless network.”

For the post and affected Microsoft products:
https://portal.msrc.microsoft.com/en-US/security-guidance/advisory/CVE-2017-13080

 

Windows 10 Cumulative Update KB4041676 Fixed

On Tuesday, October 10, 2017 Microsoft released KB4041676 as an update that includes quality improvements. What many started to notice was that it was accompanied by an issue included systems unable to boot and those cause in boot-loops.

 

Jump to quick fix: for those of you who already installed this

In the cmd line of the advanced repair options type:

Dism /Image:C:\ /Get-Packages (could be any drive, had it on D, F, and E.)
Dism /Image:C:\ /Remove-Package /PackageName:package_ for_###
(no space between package_ and for)

Remove every update that’s pending – There are 3 updates that are causing the issue they are:

  • Rollupfix_wrapper~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~14393.1770.1.6
  • Rollupfix~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~14393.1770.1.6
  • Rollupfix~31bf3856ad364e35~amd64~14393.1715. 1.10

 

Microsoft explained in a support article that this has been caused by what it describes as a “publishing issue,”

““We have corrected the publishing issue as of the afternoon of October 10th and have validated the cumulative security updates. We recommend all customers take these cumulative security updates,”.

 

At the office and in the lab:

I have taken steps to flush the update from my WSUS environments as a precaution and to allow for the corrected package to be downloaded.

 

ref:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-ca/help/4049094/windows-devices-may-fail-to-boot-after-installing-october-10-version-o

My VMware Certification Experience

I recently received my VCP6-DCV Certification from VMware by Passing the 2V0-621 Proctored Exam with Pearson VUE.

The Journey

For many years I have used VMware products. I distinctly recall getting my hands on VMware Workstation back in 2001, and it was truly an amazing tool. I could emulate Windows 3.1 and Windows 95, QNX, and even a few BSD environments, which I used to learn and troubleshoot issues.

Over the years I continued to use VMware line of products from: Workstation, ESX, GSX, and lastly the introduction of VirtualCenter.

Fast forward to now: The latest products have changed the landscape of running the data center, desktop provisioning, and the rapid deployment of test/development systems.

It was a no-brainer that I should obtain a certificate, but I never felt the need to. This changed when I was made a vExpert in 2017 this year, and that initiated my drive to do more with my knowledge and experience with the product. I now wanted to “prove” to myself, and perhaps others that I had what it takes to pass the exam and have an official recognition backing my previous and current experience levels.

VCP6-DCV Prerequisite

Obtaining the VCP6-DCV Certification requires a set of prerequisites. You need to meet all 3 requirements:

  • Attend an authorized training course
  • Pass the vSphere Foundations exam (2V0-620)
  • Pass the VCP6-DCV exam (2V0-621)

Training

The most difficult part of my path to being a vCP was finding a reputable company to train with in addition to scheduling the time to attend training. The following may sound like a plug and do I assure you that I am not being compensated for writing about them.

I choose to train with a company by the name of StormWind as they offer exceptional VMware Certified professional training which is not only budget friendly, but doesn’t require travel as training is instructor lead; Live in real time and can be done from the comfort of your home or office.

The course I enrolled in was: VMware vSphere: Install, Configure, Manage [V6], with instructor: Vince Rightley.

This was a very engaging class which allowed for attendees to not only be instructed but to participate in supplemental discussions which I personally found to be beneficial. Labs were particularly useful as they allowed for students to get hands on.

Study

vSphere Foundations exam (2V0-620)

After completion of my course I was now qualified to take the vSphere Foundations exam (2V0-620). Admittedly I rushed in to take this exam and FAILD my first attempt.

This was an eye opener that I was not fully prepared to take the test. What I discovered was that many of the resources can be found on VMware’s My Learn site. I would highly recommend following their guidance.

VCP6-DCV exam (2V0-621)

After successful passing the vSphere Foundations exam (2V0-620) it was time to start preparing myself for the VCP6-DCV exam (2V0-621)

VCP6-DCV exam Preparation

I have a few suggestions to make regarding preparation for the VCP6-DCV exam which I believe was beneficial to my success in passing.

Study the materials you obtained in your training course. Continue to leverage the study notes you made for yourself from the Foundations exam (2V0-620). Yes! You should have been keeping notes.

Seek out resources from VMware’s My Learn site. They are beneficial to your success.

Search ‘Google’ for VCP-DCV Study Guides. You will find many results many of great value

Practice Labs

I highly recommend that you gain access to a lab such as VMware’s Hands-On Labs (HOL) to get hands on to all the subject areas covered under the VCP6-DCA as you will need them. I built my own lab so I could have the full experience of building from scratch, to give me a full understanding of the environment.

Test many scenarios including areas of troubleshooting things which are broken (I had to break them, so I could fix).

Familiarizing yourself with acronyms and terms is also very helpful. Example: http://jermsmit.com/vmware-vcenter-terms-acronyms-glossary-tag-your-it/

Find yourself a practice test, and take it once a week to get yourself in accustom to taking tests; In my case it’s been a long time, and practice pays off.

Certification URL

Originally Posted on my LinkedIn

And, that’s it all folks.

–         Jermal