vSphere

vSphere 6.5: OVF Import – The provided manifest file is invalid

Importing a template from vSphere 5.5 and importing to vSphere 6.5 the following error was encountered: The provided manifest file is invalidInvalid OVF checksum algorithm: SHA1

To get fix this error the following steps were taken:

Step 1 – is to extract your ova template (after all its only a zip)

You will notice 3 files once extracted

*.vmdk – is your disk containing all your data

*.ovf – is the configuration (also the file that we will edit)

*.mf – is a manifest containing a reference to the vmdk and ovf, also holding a SHA1 hash which ESXi will check for validation. This file needs to be deleted as we are making a change to the ovf and this will surely break that hash.

Example of what the contents of the .mf file looks like:

SHA1(template.ovf)= 908e804f140ffa58083b8bd154dace330b440c78
SHA1(template-disk1.vmdk)= 29c2d44d908d0207005360dabb58967f01a1

Step 2 – Delete the file with the *.mf extension. If this exists ESXi will attempt to validate and throw an error about the templates integrity being invalid. Once this has been deleted you can deploy your OVF Template.

Ref: http://jermsmit.com/unmount-local-iso-before-making-it-an-ovf-template/

Happy Importing

vSphere Customization Specification and Ubuntu 17.10

Has anyone noticed issues with #vSphere Customization Specification and #Ubuntu 17.10 (GNU/Linux 4.13.0-25-generic x86_64) – Now that the network settings are located in: /etc/netplan/01-netcfg.yaml, I’m back to manually updating IP information (Server Naming still works).

Although the traditional /etc/network/interfaces reflects the information provided by the customization process, the host still acquires a DHCP issued address. After some digging I was able to find out that this information was no longer being referenced and is now being pulled from:/etc/netplan/01-netcfg.yaml

Here are the IP configuration details

/etc/network/interfaces:

/etc/netplan/01-netcfg.yaml:

Cannot remediate host because it is part of HA Admission Control enabled Cluster

Recently my team and I ran into incident with and error while patching esxi servers using VMware Update Manager(VUM).  When attempting o remediate the following error message was shown:

“cannot remediate host because it is part of HA Admission Control enabled Cluster”

Cause:

vCenter Server uses admission control to ensure that sufficient resources are available in a cluster to provide failover protection and to ensure that virtual machine resource reservations are respected.

Admission control imposes constraints on resource usage and any action that would violate these constraints is not permitted. If an automated process needs to take actions, it might temporarily violate the failover constraints.

 

Solution:

Before patching of the ESXi Servers that are part of the HA Cluster, make sure you have disabled “Admission Control”. Once server has been patched you can re-enable Admission Control on the cluster.

 

Steps to disable Admission Control

  • Right-click the cluster and click Edit Settings.
  • Under Cluster Features, click VMware HA.
  • Under Admission Control, select Disable: Power on VMs that violate availability constraints.
  • Click OK

This can also be disabled in the VMware Update Manager remediation wizard. When you remediate check the option “Disable High Availability admission control if it is enabled for any of the selected clusters.

 

Re: Why you should upgrade to vSphere 6.5 / ESXi 6.5

Recently I went to extend a volume on one of my guest systems and received an error requiring me to power off the system before extending the disk.

ErrorHot-extend was invoked with size (5368709120 sectors) >= 2TB. Hot-extend beyond or equal to 2TB is not supported. The disk extend operation failed: msg.disklib.INVAL

Good News – With vSphere 6.5 this is no longer a limitation.

Just one more reason why you should think about upgrading your VMware environment to the latest.

Online PowerCLI Installation, Quick Steps

Here are some quick steps to installing PowerCLI onto your computer to get you started. I performed the steps listed below on a Windows 10 Computer.

 

Overview

VMware PowerCLI is a command-line and scripting tool built on Windows PowerShell, and provides more than 600 cmdlets for managing and automating vSphere, vCloud, vRealize Operations Manager, and VMware Horizon environments.

Requirements

PowerShell or PowerShell ISE, Internet Connection

Steps

Validate that you have an internet connection. Once done we need to confirm that you can connect to the PowerShell gallery online.

This is done by issues the following command: Find-Module -Name VMware.PowerCLI

 

Next we issue the command: Install-Module -Name VMware.PowerCLI –Scope CurrentUser

If prompted to accept the repository, choose Yes to All and continue

The installation process will begin to download the modules

Later unzipping them

And a short while later the installation will complete

Verify the module by using the following command: Get-Module VMware* -ListAvailable

That’s it, your done.

 

Command list:

Find-Module -Name VMware.PowerCLI
Install-Module -Name VMware.PowerCLI –Scope CurrentUser
Get-Module VMware* -ListAvailable