Windows

Using built in Windows tool to secure wipe free disk space

So your working and had to make a backup copy of the CEO’s outlook data file onto your local computer. After your work on his or her mailbox you delete the backup.  So you think!  We know this isn’t the true and with the many free and paid tools out today a person would attempt to recover data.

There is where CIPHER comes in.

Cipher is a command-line tool (included with Windows) that you can use to manage encrypted data. It can also be used to clean the white space (unused space) on your hard drive.

Let’s get to using this shall we

First open an command prompt as Administrator.

Type cipher /? to list the syntax for the commands.  As you can see there is a lot this little tool can do.  More on this at another time.

So in my case I wanted to wipe all the free space in volume d:\ of my Windows system.  By typing cipher.exe /w:d <press enter> and I am now able to wipe the free space and any trace of my CEO’s backed up mailbox.

Now just sit back and wait until completed and your done.  Simple and effective.

 

Let’s recap

I wanted to delete the free disk space on my computer to remove the ability of data being recovered.

To do this I opened a command prompt (as administrator)
While in the command prompt typed in cipher /w:d (d being my drive)

Ref: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/298009

Update: 07/05/2017  – You could also start off by being sure that all drives were encrypted with something such as bitlocker before moving critical data onto it.

Win32DiskImager

If you ever needed to clone a USB, SD Memory card, etc. Using Win32DiskImager is a excellent program tool for the job.

Win32DiskImager, enabled you to save and restore raw images to removable media.  I have been using this for my Raspberry Pi installs and other USB Bootable media as a way to quickly backup and restore without having to do full re-installs.

 

 

How to Root Galaxy S4!

This is a video by our buddy Zedomax on rooting the Galaxy S4. This method is only for root access, its not a video on installing custom recovery, so please enjoy and remember to subscribe to his YouTube Channel.

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This method works on all Qualcomm Galaxy S4 running Android 4.2.2 including:
AT&T SGH-i337, T-Mobile SGH-M919, Sprint SPH-L720, Verizon, US Cellular, Telus, .
Rogers, etc…

For GT-i9500 octa-core S4, see other root method here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VZd71…

Download and Step-by-Step tutorial here:
http://galaxys4root.com/galaxy-s4-roo…

For rooting Galaxy S4 on Linux/Ubuntu, please see this video instead:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JIAbdV…
For rooting Galaxy S4 on Mac OSX, please see this video instead:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5Sluq…

For more awesome info on rooting the Galaxy S4 stop over at http://GalaxyS4Root.com

HowTo: Export Putty Sessions

I just rebuilt my workstation and now on the new system I would like to have all my saved Putty sessions. Putty doesn’t have a built in export feature for this. So I went looking for where Putty store its sessions info.

As there it is. In the registry, like so many other things. Here are some quick steps to do this:

  1. From the run prompt (shortcut keys: WinKey+R) enter regedit,, this opens the registry editor
  2. Locate the following branch: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\SimonTatham\PuTTY\Sessions
  3. On the File menu, click Export
  4. In File name, enter a name for the registry file; In my case I named this Putty_Sessions
  5. Choose a location to save the file; You can now copy this file and import your the sessions data on the new system.

Update: I changed the export to the following

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\SimonTatham]

PowerShell: Get basic network adapter properties

Get-NetAdapter cmdlet returns to you the basic network adapter properties of visible adapters installed on your system. This is a very useful tool to gather some details about your installed network adapters.

More info and features can be found here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj130867.aspx