Windows

HowTo: Export Putty Sessions

I just rebuilt my workstation and now on the new system I would like to have all my saved Putty sessions. Putty doesn’t have a built in export feature for this. So I went looking for where Putty store its sessions info.

As there it is. In the registry, like so many other things. Here are some quick steps to do this:

  1. From the run prompt (shortcut keys: WinKey+R) enter regedit,, this opens the registry editor
  2. Locate the following branch: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\SimonTatham\PuTTY\Sessions
  3. On the File menu, click Export
  4. In File name, enter a name for the registry file; In my case I named this Putty_Sessions
  5. Choose a location to save the file; You can now copy this file and import your the sessions data on the new system.

Update: I changed the export to the following

[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\SimonTatham]

PowerShell: Get basic network adapter properties

Get-NetAdapter cmdlet returns to you the basic network adapter properties of visible adapters installed on your system. This is a very useful tool to gather some details about your installed network adapters.

More info and features can be found here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj130867.aspx

 

Get to Network Connections UI by using “ncpa.cpl”

Looking for a quick way to get to your network connections: Control PanelNetwork and InternetNetwork Connections

From the run prompt (shortcut keys: WinKey+R) enter ncpa.cpl. You will immediately open a window that takes you to the network connections UI without traveling thought the network sharing center.

If you want to create a quick shortcut you can file this in the following location: “C:WindowsSystem32ncpa.cpl

This works in Windows 7, Windows 8, Server 2008 (and R2) along with Server 2012

More info: Description of Control Panel (.cpl) Files

So go; Run, you silly boy. And remember

Some Basic Use of Nmap

Nmap (“Network Mapper”) is a free and open source utility for network discovery and security auditing. I along with many other systems and network administrators also find it to be a useful tool for the right job. Nmap can be installed and used in Windows, and mostly common in Linux distributions such as Debian and the well known Ubuntu.

You can get the Windows install form http://nmap.org/ along with the Linux versions.  In Linux (Debian) I simple sudo apt-get install nmap -y and the rest is done in a few seconds.

Now that you have Nmap, what can you do? Here are some examples I use every so often:

~# nmap google.com – gives me info about google.com (Hostname google.com resolves to 11 IPs..)

~# nmap 192.168.1.0/24 – scans my network and return info on machines and service ports listening

~# nmap -sP 192.168.1.100 – attempts to detect if a host is up or down

~# nmap -PN 192.168.1.100 – attempts to detect if a host is up or down (no pings sent)

~# nmap -sT 192.168.1.100 – port scan using TCP

~# nmap -sU 192.168.1.100 – port scan using UDP

~# nmap -O 192.168.1.100 – attempts to identify the remote OS, returns TCP/IP fingerprint

And I could go on, but lets just end these example here and I’m sure you’ll find others.

Run … run, you clever boy … and remember. – Clara Oswald

Extending Windows 8 Trial


I have been using the Windows 8 Enterprise for several months this way for testing rather than backup my data and reinstall the OS just to reinstall my applications, followed by configuration tweaks, which can be time consuming. I have started extending the trail to give me more time.

The process of extending a trial is called ‘rearming’.
Here is how I have done so:

  1. Open the command prompt as (Admin) | Answer Yes to the User Account Control
  2. You can then check your license information by typing slmgr /dli – this provides information on your version and license status.
  3. You could also use the command slmgr /dlv for more detailed information – good to give you status of how long you have before complete expiration of your trial 

If you just want the expiration date info type: slmgr /xpr

And finally what you have been waiting for: The rearm command.
Like the ones I mentioned above all you need to do is type: slmgr /rearm then reboot the computer.

This can be done no more than 3 times of the life of the install of the Windows 8 system. If you time it correctly you could have Windows 8 for free for 270 days. How cool is that.

Info on my test machines:
1 Physical Machine and 2 Virtual Machines (VMware)