Android

Meltdown & Spectre Vulnerabilities

Meltdown and Spectre exploit critical vulnerabilities in modern processors. These hardware bugs allow programs to steal data which is currently processed on the computer.  Malicious programs can exploit Meltdown and Spectre to get hold of secrets stored in the memory of other running programs obtaining passwords, logon details and what was once thought to be secured information.

Meltdown and Spectre work on personal computers, mobile devices, and in the Cloud – AWS, Azure, and other 3rd party Cloud / IaaS Providers.

Meltdown breaks the most fundamental isolation between user applications and the operating system. This attack allows a program to access the memory, and thus also the secrets, of other programs and the operating system. If your computer has a vulnerable processor and runs an un-patched operating system, it is not safe to work with sensitive information without the chance of leaking the information. This applies both to personal computers as well as cloud infrastructure.

Spectre breaks the isolation between different applications. It allows an attacker to trick error-free programs, which follow best practices, into leaking their secrets. In fact, the safety checks of said best practices actually increase the attack surface and may make applications more susceptible to Spectre.

 

Vendor recommendations:

Information on the vulnerabilities:

 

Current known list of affected vendors and their respective advisories and/or patch announcements below

Vendor Advisory/Announcement
Amazon (AWS) AWS-2018-013: Processor Speculative Execution Research Disclosure
AMD An Update on AMD Processor Security
Android (Google) Android Security Bulletin—January 2018
Apple HT208331: About the security content of macOS High Sierra 10.13.2, Security Update 2017-002 Sierra, and Security Update 2017-005 El Capitan
HT208394: About speculative execution vulnerabilities in ARM-based and Intel CPUs
ARM Vulnerability of Speculative Processors to Cache Timing Side-Channel Mechanism
Azure (Microsoft) Securing Azure customers from CPU vulnerability
Microsoft Cloud Protections Against Speculative Execution Side-Channel Vulnerabilities
Chromium Project Actions Required to Mitigate Speculative Side-Channel Attack Techniques
Cisco cisco-sa-20180104-cpusidechannel – CPU Side-Channel Information Disclosure Vulnerabilities
Citrix CTX231399: Citrix Security Updates for CVE-2017-5715, CVE-2017-5753, CVE-2017-5754
Debian Debian Security Advisory DSA-4078-1 linux — security update
Dell SLN308587 – Microprocessor Side-Channel Attacks (CVE-2017-5715, CVE-2017-5753, CVE-2017-5754): Impact on Dell products
SLN308588 – Microprocessor Side-Channel Attacks (CVE-2017-5715, CVE-2017-5753, CVE-2017-5754): Impact on Dell EMC products (Dell Enterprise Servers, Storage and Networking)
F5 Networks K91229003: Side-channel processor vulnerabilities CVE-2017-5715, CVE-2017-5753, and CVE-2017-5754
Google’s Project Zero Reading Privileged Memory with a Side-Channel
Huawei Security Notice – Statement on the Media Disclosure of the Security Vulnerabilities in the Intel CPU Architecture Design
IBM Potential CPU Security Issue
Intel INTEL-SA-00088 Speculative Execution and Indirect Branch Prediction Side Channel Analysis Method
Lenovo Lenovo Security Advisory LEN-18282: Reading Privileged Memory with a Side Channel
Microsoft Security Advisory 180002: Guidance to mitigate speculative execution side-channel vulnerabilities
Windows Client guidance for IT Pros to protect against speculative execution side-channel vulnerabilities
Windows Server guidance to protect against speculative execution side-channel vulnerabilities
SQL Server Guidance to protect against speculative execution side-channel vulnerabilities
Important information regarding the Windows security updates released on January 3, 2018 and anti-virus software
Mozilla Mozilla Foundation Security Advisory 2018-01: Speculative execution side-channel attack (“Spectre”)
NetApp NTAP-20180104-0001: Processor Speculated Execution Vulnerabilities in NetApp Products
nVidia Security Notice ID 4609: Speculative Side Channels
Security Bulletin 4611: NVIDIA GPU Display Driver Security Updates for Speculative Side Channels
Security Bulletin 4613: NVIDIA Shield TV Security Updates for Speculative Side Channels
Raspberry Pi Foundation Why Raspberry Pi isn’t vulnerable to Spectre or Meltdown
Red Hat Kernel Side-Channel Attacks – CVE-2017-5754 CVE-2017-5753 CVE-2017-5715
SUSE SUSE Linux security updates CVE-2017-5715
SUSE Linux security updates CVE-2017-5753
SUSE Linux security updates CVE-2017-5754
Synology Synology-SA-18:01 Meltdown and Spectre Attacks
Ubuntu Ubuntu Updates for the Meltdown / Spectre Vulnerabilities
VMware NEW VMSA VMSA-2018-0002 VMware ESXi, Workstation and Fusion updates address side-channel analysis due to speculative execution
Xen Advisory XSA-254: Information leak via side effects of speculative execution

Google ‘Android Things’ — An Operating System for the Internet of Things

“If you can build an app, you can build a device.”

Google announced a Developers Preview of “Android Things” — an Android-based operating system platform for smart devices and Internet of Things (IoT) products headed our way.  Best of all, its designed to make it easier for developers to build a smart appliance since they will be able to work with Android APIs and Google Services they’re already familiar with.

So if you want to jump right in, come join us.  Just following this link: https://developer.android.com/things/index.html

 

Over 1 Million Google Accounts Hacked by ‘Gooligan’

As you know by now from the latest buzz. Over 1 Million #Google Accounts Hacked by ‘Gooligan’. Gooligan itself isn’t new, as its just a variant of  Ghost Push, a piece of Android malware

Researchers from security firm Check Point Software Technologies have found the existence of this malware in apps available in third-party marketplaces.

Once installed it then roots the phone to to gain system level access.  The rooted devices then download and install software that steals the authentication tokens that allow the phones to access the owner’s Google-related accounts without having to enter a password. The tokens work for a variety of Google properties, including Gmail, Google Photos, Google Docs, Google Play, Google Drive, and G Suite

In a recent blog post by the folks over at Check Point:  http://blog.checkpoint.com/2016/11/30/1-million-google-accounts-breached-gooligan/

“The infection begins when a user downloads and installs a Gooligan-infected app on a vulnerable Android device. Our research team has found infected apps on third-party app stores, but they could also be downloaded by Android users directly by tapping malicious links in phishing attack messages. After an infected app is installed, it sends data about the device to the campaign’s Command and Control (C&C) server.

Gooligan then downloads a rootkit from the C&C server that takes advantage of multiple Android 4 and 5 exploits including the well-known VROOT (CVE-2013-6282) and Towelroot (CVE-2014-3153). These exploits still plague many devices today because security patches that fix them may not be available for some versions of Android, or the patches were never installed by the user. If rooting is successful, the attacker has full control of the device and can execute privileged commands remotely.

After achieving root access, Gooligan downloads a new, malicious module from the C&C server and installs it on the infected device. This module injects code into running Google Play or GMS (Google Mobile Services) to mimic user behavior so Gooligan can avoid detection, a technique first seen with the mobile malware HummingBad. The module allows Gooligan to:

  • Steal a user’s Google email account and authentication token information
  • Install apps from Google Play and rate them to raise their reputation
  • Install adware to generate revenue

Ad servers, which don’t know whether an app using its service is malicious or not, send Gooligan the names of the apps to download from Google Play. After an app is installed, the ad service pays the attacker. Then the malware leaves a positive review and a high rating on Google Play using content it receives from the C&C server.”

Android users who have downloaded apps from third-party markets can visit the Check Point blog post for a list of the apps known to contain Gooligan.

Also Check Point has released what is being called the Gooligan Checker web page to be used to check if you have been compromised by this latest threat.

 

 

TunnelBear – Simple, Private and Free

TunnelBear has just launched a Chrome extension that helps to protect your privacy on a Chromebook, Android, iPhone, iPad, PC & Mac

TunnelBear is a Canadian company famous for making super easy to use privacy tools. They specialize in VPN services that allow your phone and computers to be secure when using public WiFi hotspots. Their service also allows you to “tunnel” into another country to get around content blocking by governments or media companies.

Today TunnelBear is launching a public beta version of their new Chrome extension. When installed, it will protect everything you do in Chrome by running it through an encrypted web proxy.

For Chromebook users, almost everything you do should be encrypted, making it a great tool to have. For Windows, Mac, or Linux users, please note that only your Chrome connection will be secured – not the rest of your system’s traffic.

TunnelBear offers a free plan for those with low data usage, or a very cheap paid plan for everyone else.

Credit for the original post: https://plus.google.com/+CraigTumblison  Thanks dude

AT&T Galaxy S4 SGH-I337 OTA Update to Lollipop

Woke up this morning to Lollipop, so its official AT&T has finally started pushing out the highly-anticipated Android 5.0 Lollipop Over-The-Air (OTA) update for Galaxy S4

Now its time for me to find a method to root and enable some features such as Wifi Tethering

Tech Info:

  • Model SAMSUNG-SGH-I337
  • Android Ver: 5.0.1
  • Baseband Ver: I337UCUGOC3
  • Kernel Ver: 3.4.0-4408911
  • Build Number: LRX22C.I337UCUGOC3