SharePoint

Using Get-SPWebTemplate to list available site templates in SharePoint 2013

In this tech-short we will go over a simple yet effective way to list out the available site templates in SharePoint 2013.

Using the New-SPSite PowerShell cmdlet allows you to specify the name of a template to use. In my case I was unaware of the name of available templates in my SharePoint installation.  Using the Get-SPWebTemplate command to produce a list for me.

Steps

  1. Open the SharePoint 2013 Management Shell
  2. The the following command: Get-SPWebTemplate | Sort-Object “Name”

The results are a list Templates which could be used in this environment.

 

If you wanted to do the same with PowerShell locally or remote the following steps can be taken.

Open PowerShell and issue the following commands:

  1. New-PSSession -ComputerName SharePoint
  2. Add-PSSnapin Microsoft.SharePoint.Powershell
  3. Get-SPWebTemplate | Sort-Object “Name”

SharePoint Server 2016 IT Preview

The SharePoint Server 2016 preview is now available to download from the Microsoft website:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=48712

Note: Windows Server 2012 R2 is required

Brief on Install Instructions

  1. Review SharePoint Server system requirements
  2. Download and install full-featured software for a 180-day trial
  3. When prompted, use the following product key: NQTMW-K63MQ-39G6H-B2CH9-FRDWJ

Unable to open Office Documents, SharePoint 2013 On-Prem

 

We have recently encountered a strange issue where users get stuck on the Word, Excel, Powerpoint splash logo where it says “Contacting the server for information.”  We have spent several days on this issue and it seems to have impacted a large user base.

I am working with the team here to find a resolution and as soon as I know of one I will share.

–update–

We have tested this in several test, demo SharePoint 2013 deployments and are facing the same issue.

Here is something new:  When tested with SharePoint Online the issue does not exist { scratching my head }

Joined in on a thread about this issue, where others are also facing the same incident
Link:  https://community.office365.com/en-us/f/154/p/412623/1024983#1024983

–update–

Steps taken: with no resolution

  • Attempt to open from SharePoint on another piece of hardware or virtual machine with the same exact versions of Office including updates – issue does not occur
  • Logging in with another use, even when creating a new profile on same affected OS / Hardware install the issue occurs
  • Attempts to remove windows updates, office updates do not resolve the issue
  • Repair or Uninstall followed by reinstall of Office 2013 doesn’t resolve the issue
  • Tested with a new SharePoint 2013, including a pre install contoso installations, the issue occurs

Environments:

We have workstations running Windows 8.1, Windows 10 all having these issues.

Note:

  1. this issue has not affected users who are using Office 2016
  2. this issue has not affected users who using SharePoint Online

No much more is known about this issues cause. The only solution which works at this time is to clean install or system restore to a point prior to this issues occurrence

There is a possibility that an antivirus may be causing this issue the future of the anti virus causing it is still unknown.

*UPDATE*

In my case this incident was directly related to ESET and its filtering of HTTP requests. Disabling this filtering resolved the issue.

I must note that disabling all security isn’t the best choice so here is some info from ESET to help you filter out and white list requests to avoid such an issue

http://support.eset.com/kb939/

 

Renaming SharePoint 2013 Server

I spent sometime today renaming SharePoint 2013 Servers for a project I was pulled in on. It involved using PowerShell cmdlets and other administrative tasks.

The project required me to “Clone” SharePoint farm servers to make template environments for demonstration and development task.

I originally followed steps provided here: Renaming SharePoint then later streamlined the process so its something I found useful. Here are my notes saved in PowerShell format so it could be run step by step using PowerShell ISE:

 

Best,

Jermal

The Truth – Single Sign On with Outlook and Office 365

After many twists and turns on this bumpy road of setting up a Hybrid Deployment of Exchange Online with AD Sync and ADFS for SSO.  I am faced with yet another issue.

Let me tell you what does work with the single sign on:

  • Outlook via Web Access
  • Office 365 Portal
  • Office 365 SharePoint
  • Office 365 Yammer
  • Office 365 Web Apps
  • Office 365 Lync Online

For the most part any Office 365 web services offered using a web browser, as long as its Internet Explorer.

Missing from the above list of working items is Outlook! That’s right; Outlook doesn’t work.

In fact; users of Outlook will be prompted to enter their credentials on first use.  Let me break right here and describe first use.

First use is any time you open Outlook, you will be prompt for a password to log in.  Unless you save it.

In addition to having to save your password locally in the Windows Credential Manager, you will need to update this password which was saved each and every time you change your password.

This is not my understanding of what the term “Single Sign On” was to be. Good job to Microsoft’s Office 365 Marketing Team.  You had/have so many of us as believers.

At this time I am very disappointed about the Outlook prompts for password credentials. Perhaps they will fix in the future.

Research

I was able to find the following ADFS White Paper on Office 365 Single Sign-On with AD FS which should provide more details.

I also found info confirming that Outlook wasn’t designed to support Single Sign On.  It has even been quoted “The Office 365 experience for logging on to Microsoft Outlook connections is also not expected to be a single sign-on experience.”KB2535227 (A federated user is prompted unexpectedly to enter their credentials when they access an Office 365 resource)

I apologize for the somewhat rant; but felt I needed to share this before many of you waste a lot of time and investment on trying to get something like this working, to only find out one of the major reasons to use it doesn’t work.

Perhaps Microsoft should read the Internet more before misusing terms such as SSO.

“With SSO, a user logs in once and gains access to different applications, without the need to re-enter log-in credentials at each application.”

http://www.techopedia.com/definition/4106/single-sign-on-sso

Single sign-on (SSO) is a property of access control of multiple related, but independent software systems. With this property a user logs in once and gains access to all systems without being prompted to log in again at each of them.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_sign_on

Single signon takes away the need for the user to enter further authentications when switching from one application to another.”

http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/S/single_signon.html

Single sign-on (SSO) is mechanism whereby a single action of user authentication and authorization can permit a user to access all computers and systems where he has access permission, without the need to enter multiple passwords. Single sign-on reduces human error, a major component of systems failure and is therefore highly desirable but difficult to implement.

http://www.opengroup.org/security/sso/

– Jermal

SharePoint 2013: Upgrade to Claims Based Authentication

Claims-based authentication is an essential component to enable the advanced functionality of SharePoint 2013.

To move classic-mode web applications from SharePoint 2010 Products to SharePoint 2013, you can convert them to claims-based web applications within SharePoint 2010 Products, and then migrate them to SharePoint 2013.

The procedures in this post will address the issue I had faced after upgrading to SharePoint 2013 from 2010.

Due to classic mode authentication being officially depreciated by Microsoft, the database needed to be updated to claims based authentication.

During my testing; I noticed many (if not all) users accounts had issued logging into sites which worked prior to the upgrade.  I was removing and re adding them to work around this issue ; which was very tedious.

Using the Convert-SPWebApplication PowerShell command simplified this task.

Here are the steps I took

Launched SharePoint 2013 Management Shell as Administrator

Enter the following commands

Convert-SPWebApplication -Identity <URL> -To Claims -RetainPermissions

Please note the <URL> is the http://address to your SharePoint 2013 site application. Example: http://corp.jermsmit.com

For more info check out: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg251985.aspx

SharePoint 2013 Upgrade Testing – My InfoPath Issue

I have been testing various features and functionally of a  recent SharePoint 2010 to SharePoint 2013 upgrade I preformed. When I encountered an issue involving a list item used heavily buy one of my departments.

The issue presented itself when the users attempted to create new work items and this is when SharePoint 2013 displayed an informative error messages telling me something went wrong.

I was able to obtain the correlation ID,

and after some filtering and digging in the ULS  (Unified Logging System) I was able to see that this list was created using InfoPath.

After seeking additional information from a few developers it was suggested that this form may need to be recreated. I was later to find out that other customer shave been facing issues with InfoPath and SharePoint 2013 forms.

The Office Team @ Microsoft has released a statement via their Blog that they are “evolving  forms technology” in an effort to streamline and deliver a more integrated  user experience.

In their own words:  “we’re retiring InfoPath and investing in new forms technology across SharePoint, Access, and Word. This means that InfoPath 2013 is the last release of the desktop client, and InfoPath Forms Services in SharePoint Server 2013 is the last release of InfoPath Forms Services.” 

I am taking that means the older forms used from back in Office SharePoint Server 2007 have been deprecated, eventually the rest.

That said here is a link to their blog post:
Update on InfoPath and SharePoint Forms

 

SharePoint List View Lookup Threshold

Testing a pilot of a recent SharePoint 2010 to SharePoint 2013 upgrade I encountered a message reading: “This view cannot be displayed because the number of lookup and workflow status columns it contains exceeds the threshold (8) enforced by the administrator”

This seems to be resource throttling introduced in the web application to limit the number of items in a list view, which roughly means “woah, whats with the large database query dude”

I was able to locate where this throttling setting is located.

Open Central Administration > Application Management > Manage Web Applications (choose the application)> General Settings (a drop-down list should show, now select) > Resource Throttling

Scroll down and locate ‘List View Lookup Threshold‘ The default value is 8

Honestly, I have no idea how large this should be. I didn’t design the list. However Microsoft has some details of creating lists here. The only major concern here is obvious “Resources”.

So what I did was double the value that was the default

Please note that this solution by far is not 100% correct as I just tossed resources at an issue to resolve it. However without prior knowledge of list design this solution works.

Error seen on end user side:

SharePoint 2010 to SharePoint 2013, Content Database Upgrade

I have been working on upgrading SharePoint 2010 to SharePoint 2013.  Here are some notes on steps taken to update a content database for your default web application.

Please note:  

  1. A backup of your default (primary) SharePoint 2010 content database is needed.
  2. These steps are for those who have already installed SharePoint and have a functioning central administration site working.

Step 1 – Backup of content database.

In order to upgrade and mount your SharePoint 2010 content database in SharePoint 2013 you will need to create a backup of the content database and restore this onto the database server chosen to server as your SharePoint 2013 database. While a new server is not required (space permitting) you may do this on the same database by restoring with a different name.

Step 2 – Create new (in my case) default application site

To attach the restored SharePoint 2010 database to the SharePoint 2013 installation, we need to create a new application site.

  • Open Central Administration
  • In Central Administration, select Application Management then select Manage Web Applications 
  • One under the Manage Web Applications, click  New to create a new web application
  • This bring you to the ‘Create New Application setup model.  There are many options here. In my case I am setting up just a new SharePoint site.
  • Create a new IIS website – For my setup I am keeping the default name. If the site runs on port 80 no need to change this. I am keeping the default site path, and being that this is part of an upgrade of a SharePoint 2010 database I am calling the database WSS_Content_delete_me as a reminded to delete later.
    Click OK and you will see the following popup
  • Followed by a message indicating that your application has been created.
  • We now want to make our way to Central Administration > Application Management and select, Manage content database 
  • Selecting the database we created above: ‘WSS_Content_delete_me’ we choose the option to remove the content database from the newly created application
  •  Click ‘ok’ to complete this action

Step 3 – Upgrade and Mount (attach) Database

The next steps require us to use SharePoint 2013’s Management Shell to mount the SharePoint 2010 database and in doing so upgrade it to function with SharePoint 2013.

We run the following command syntax to mount  the database:

To mount: Mount-SPContentDatabase -Name <database_name> -WebApplication http://<sharepoint_server_application>

To test: Test-SPContentDatabase -Name <database_name> -WebApplication http://<sharepoint_server_application>

Depending on the size of the content database, you may have to wait for a short period of time for the upgrade to complete.

* note * you may encounter error messages at the end of the upgrade once completed indicating customization’s that are not supported in SharePoint 2013.

SharePoint 2010 – Updating Webpart Solution

Similar to my previous post SharePoint 2010 – Deploying Webpart Solution, the upgrade process of a Webpart Solution you have a few steps to take to make this all happen.

As I did in my previous post:

I copied the webpart to the local disk of my SharePoint 2010 server. Placing it in a folder c:install this time around I am not going to be running the command Add-SPSolution c:installSharePointWebpart.wsp as it already exist. If you do you will get an error stating that the solution already exists.

What you will need to do is run the following command for example: Update-SPSolution –Identity SharePointWebpart.wsp –LiteralPath c:installSharePointWebpart.wsp –GACDeployment

For more info on features and solutions cmdlets: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff607724.aspx