jermsmit

New Phishing Scam Using Microsoft Office 365

*** Attention Required ***

It seems that the bad guys are at it once again with an attempt to collect information by phishing credentials from those of us using Office 365 for corporate emails.  The characteristics of this particular attack the hackers intention is to deceive Office 365 users into providing their login credentials”.

The user sees a fake Office 365 login page, which requests their credentials. Once the Office 365 usernames and passwords have been compromised, the hackers can:

  • Send emails to other users in the victim’s address book, asking them for anything, sending fake invoices, sending more phishing emails, etc.
  • Access the user’s OneDrive account, to download files, install more malware, infect files with malware, etc.
  • Access the users SharePoint account, to download files, install more malware, etc.
  • Steal company intellectual property or other customer information such as customer SSNs, credit card numbers, email addresses, etc.

One of the characteristic of this recent attack is an email being sent with an embedded image which resembles an Microsoft Office Word document containing a link back to a site with a fake Office 365 logon page.  In addition to this the site URL ends in php?userid= syntax.

I have provided the following YouTube video to illustrate the interaction of the fake Office 365 logon page.

Link: https://youtu.be/wHxkzxGF4JY

 

Advice:

It’s an important part of your responsibility to be cautious when accessing emails even from known senders to ensure its legitimate by reviewing the email to ensure that its legitimate.

If in doubt do not open the email and reach out to the sender to ensure they sent you the email.  If you self-determine an email to be suspicious immediately report incidents as soon as they happen.

 

Here are a few guidelines below that could be followed.  Please review:

 

Check the sender.

Sometimes, cybercriminals and hackers will fake (or “spoof”) the sender of an email. If the “from” address doesn’t match the alleged sender of the email, or if it doesn’t make sense in the context of the email, something may be suspicious.

Check for (in)sanity.

Many typical phishing emails are mass-produced by hackers using templates or generic messages. While sophisticated attacks may use more convincing fake emails, scammers looking to hit as many different inboxes as possible may send out large numbers of mismatched and badly written emails. If the email’s content is nonsensical or doesn’t match the subject, something may be suspicious.

Check the salutation.

Many business and commercial emails from legitimate organizations will be addressed to you by name. If an email claims to come from an organization you know but has a generic salutation, something may be suspicious.

Check the links.

A large number of phishing emails try to get victims to click on links to malicious websites in order to steal data or download malware. Always verify that link addresses are spelled correctly, and hover your mouse over a link to check its true destination. Beware of shortened links like http://bit.ly, http://goog.le, and http://tinyurl.com. If an email links to a suspicious website, something may be suspicious.

Don’t let them scare you.

Cyber criminals may use threats or a false sense of urgency to trick you into acting without thinking. If an email threatens you with consequences for not doing something immediately, something may be suspicious.

Don’t open suspicious attachments.

Some phishing emails try to get you to open an attached file. These attachments often contain malware that will infect your device; if you open them, you could be giving hackers access to your data or control of your device. If you get an unexpected or suspicious attachment in an email, something may be suspicious.

Don’t believe names and logos alone.

With the rise in spear phishing, cybercriminals may include real names, logos, and other information in their emails to more convincingly impersonate an individual or group that you trust. Just because an email contains a name or logo you recognize doesn’t mean that it’s trustworthy. If an email misuses logos or names, or contains made-up names, something may be suspicious.

If you still aren’t sure, verify!

If you think a message could be legitimate, but you aren’t sure, try verifying it. Contact the alleged sender separately (e.g., by phone) to ask about the message. If you received an email instructing you to check your account settings or perform some similar action, go to your account page separately to check for notices or settings.

 

 

Going Vegan for 30 Days – Part 1

 

Hey friends,

Here I am, making my very own attempt choice to try do new things while learn something about myself and others via what we all love… Food! This is not some new short lived diet that I am attempting. Its a peek into a lifestyle that many others, and a few friends live.

Today it technical the 2nd day for me… Not bad as I have been preparing myself for over a year now. This is now my commitment for the next 30 days.

With that I will leave myself the following note.

Jermal: Things you can’t eat –

  • Butter or cream
  • Eggs
  • Cheese from cows or goats
  • Milk from cows or goats
  • Meat, poultry, lamb, or beef
  • Fish, shellfish, shrimp, or lobster
  • Gelatin
  • Honey (this one is going to be hard; I love honey in my tea)
  • Anything that poops

Jermal: Things you can and should eat –

  • All fruits
  • All vegetables
  • All herbs and spices
  • Beans
  • Soy-based protein like tofu and tempeh
  • Grains
  • Pasta (that’s not made from eggs)
  • Olive oil

Admittedly I will need help from some of you in the community, so please comment and help me with some tips / advice. I have already singed up for PETA’s vegan starter kit! Time to pull in the other resources I’ve booked marked over the year

More to come.

‘#22Kill’ Push-up Challenge, What It Means

A few weeks back, I had the chance to visit the Team #22KILL website and to participate in this now social media awareness challenge to bring about awareness not only to myself but to others that a shocking number of  soldiers and veterans die every day as a result of suicide.

Marked by the hashtag “#22Kill” , “#22KillPushUpChallenge,”  or “#22pushups”, people are responding with 22 push-ups for a cause.

As stated on the site the goal is to “Help us reach our goal to get 22 Million pushups – To honor those who serve and to raise awareness for veteran suicide prevention through education and empowerment.”

So my journey began via my YouTube channel 

Starting From Day 1 to Day 22

Suicide Prevention, whether it be for vet’s or the everyday person is a serious cause that needs your support.

If You Need help? For Yourself or a Loved one.

Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at: 1 (800) 273-8255

You will find supportive individuals willing to offer you the tools you need.

If you want to join the challenge – or challenge a friend – make sure that you include the hashtag “#22Kill” and that your post is made “public” so that 22Kill can keep their count accurate. You can also become a veteran advocate yourself by volunteering through the 22Kill organization website.

Thanks

VMware vCenter 6 Phantom Snapshots

I’ve been using vCenter 6 for a while now and noticed an odd issue pertaining to snapshots. It seems that all guest show a “revert to current snapshot” state even if a snapshot does not actually exist.

However viewing under the Snapshot Manger… shows no existing snapshots associated with the virtual machine guests.

I’ve noticed this this issue does not exist when using the vSphere Web Client.

These symptoms have been confirmed by VMware official in the following KB: https://kb.vmware.com/kb/2111363

For now there are no resolution steps…

Symptom Recap:

  • There are no snapshots on virtual machine(s).
  • Virtual machines show Revert to current snapshot (right-click on the virtual machine > Snapshot > Revert to current snapshot) enabled in vSphere Client when connected to the vCenter Server 6.0.
  • When viewing the Snapshot Manager (right-click on the virtual machine > Snapshot > Snapshot Manager) for the virtual machine in the vSphere Client, there are no snapshots present.
  • Directly logging into the ESXi host using the vSphere Client shows the Revert to current snapshot grayed out.
  • Creating and deleting a snapshot does not resolve this issue.
  • In the vSphere Web Client Revert to current snapshot appears grayed out.

Work around: 

  1. Ignore the vSphere Client results and use the vSphere Web Client
  2. Use PowerCli to display snapshots.

Example command I like to use:

 

SharePoint Server 2016 IT Preview

The SharePoint Server 2016 preview is now available to download from the Microsoft website:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=48712

Note: Windows Server 2012 R2 is required

Brief on Install Instructions

  1. Review SharePoint Server system requirements
  2. Download and install full-featured software for a 180-day trial
  3. When prompted, use the following product key: NQTMW-K63MQ-39G6H-B2CH9-FRDWJ