Tools

Active Directory Replication Status Tool

The Active Directory Replication Status Tool (ADREPLSTATUS) analyzes the replication status for domain controllers in an Active Directory domain or forest.

The Active Directory Replication Status Tool (ADREPLSTATUS) analyzes the replication status for domain controllers in an Active Directory domain or forest. ADREPLSTATUS displays data in a format that is similar to REPADMIN /SHOWREPL * /CSV imported into Excel but with significant enhancements.
Specific capabilities for this tool include:

• Expose Active Directory replication errors occurring in a domain or forest
• Prioritize errors that need to be resolved in order to avoid the creation of lingering objects in Active Directory forests
• Help administrators and support professionals resolve replication errors by linking to Active Directory replication troubleshooting content on Microsoft TechNet
• Allow replication data to be exported to source or destination domain administrators or support professionals for offline analysis

Download the Active Directory Replication Status Tool

 

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Capture Traffic from Smart Devices with Fiddler

This method applies to any device on your network where you can change the values of the network proxy. I sought out this information with the intent to learn how secure are some of the the mobile applications I had been using day to day were. And when I’m sick with a head-cold the mind goes into overtime…

So the questions I had for myself (or you) are. Would someone potentially capture my traffic; are the app’s using SSL of any type, more so are they validating the SSL certificate to ensure that its valid? More on this later, and let just say I’ve very disappointed in some of my favorite app I often use.

To allow Fiddler to act as a proxy and capture network data from devices (or other…):

  1. Start Fiddler on the system you are going to use as your proxy server
  2. Click Tools > Fiddler Options. Ensure Allow remote clients to connect is checked.
  3. After making these changes I noticed I needed to restart the program for it to work
  4. On the smart device (tablet or phone or computer or whatever, set the proxy settings to the IP address  of the computer hosting fiddler using the port 8888 or any other port you assigned for the proxy

Link: Get-Fiddler

How to Find Hardware Devices in Linux with lshw

I needed to know the exact serial number of a failed disk drive in a software RAID set. I used the lshw tool to list out the drives on my system so that I could identify the disk that had failed.

This tool will list the the hardware you are running and a good way to inventory what’s under the hood without opening the box.

lshw is available on most package management systems.

If you use APT (Debian-based Linux: Ubuntu for example), run the following command in terminal: sudo apt-get install lshw

If you use Yum (Red Hat, Fedora, CentOS, Yellow Dog Linux, etc), run the following command in terminal: sudo yum install lshw

 

Ubuntu: My day-to-day Linux commands

And now a bit of the day-to-day Linux commands I use in Ubuntu 

ls -l
This the most common command that all *nix users use to show the file(s) in list format.

rm -rf <filename(s)>
To delete a file, use this command. Be careful, no retrieval will help you to get your file.

/etc/init.d/networking restart
I use to do this just to restart my networking everytime I make some changes on /etc/network/interfaces or just to restart ethernet to get a new IP from DHCP server.

ping <hostname>
To make sure that you’re connected to the internet, use this command to test your connection to <hostname>. Example:

~# ping 8.8.8.8
PING 8.8.8.8 (8.8.8.8) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=1 ttl=251 time=14.4 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=2 ttl=251 time=14.9 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=3 ttl=251 time=15.4 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_req=4 ttl=251 time=17.7 ms

— 8.8.8.8 ping statistics —
4 packets transmitted, 4 received, 0% packet loss, time 3005ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 14.487/15.655/17.796/1.280 ms

cat <filename>
To show the content of <filename>

dpkg-reconfigure <package_name>
Debian uses this command to configure some packages configuration.

apt-get install <package_name>

apt-get update && apt-get upgrade

To make sure you have the latest package list, use the command apt-get update and to upgrade your package to the latest version use command apt-get upgrade or you can just use both command in one single line.

apt-get remove <package>
To uninstall package, use the above command.

dpkg -P <package>
Sometime some configuration file(s) are not completely removed. Use this command to clean all the file(s) related to the package

dpkg -l | grep <>
To see what kind of package(s) is or are installed use the command

dpkg -l or if you need to know whether you have installed package X or not you can simply use dpkg -l | grep X

grep <word> <filename>
If you need to know whether in <filename> contains this <word> you can use this command.

:> <filename>
To empty or erase the content of <filename>

locate <filename>
This is for finding <filename> using file list database.

du -h
If you can’t see how big the size of your directory is using ls -l, use this command.

df -h
This is to list the mounted partition available on your computer.

traceroute <hostname|fqdn>
To check how ‘far’ your computer from <hostname|fqdn>

Testing Remote access to Exchange with Microsoft Exchange Remote Connectivity Analyzer

The Microsoft Exchange Remote Connectivity Analyzer is awesome tool for troubleshooting Exchange external access.

If you are setting up a new Exchange environment and want to test remotely, this is the tool for you.